Document Type

Thesis

Date of Degree Completion

Summer 2017

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Cultural and Environmental Resource Management

Committee Chair

Patrick Lubinski

Second Committee Member

Steven Hackenberger

Third Committee Member

Roger Keirs

Fourth Committee Member

Megan Partlow

Abstract

The Anderson Creek archaeological site (45KP233) was excavated by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) in 2015, as part of a fish passage replacement project in Puget Sound. Faunal analysis of remains from this excavation was completed by the author in collaboration with Dr. Megan Partlow. Analysis documented a variety of mammal and fish remains, consisting primarily of salmon, flatfishes, deer and elk. In addition to general faunal results reported to WSDOT, I discuss bone fragmentation, herring in regional sites, and the value of 1/16” fine screen sampling and analysis. To address the last, I compared fish identifications from excavation unit DR3 between the 1/8” and larger mesh fraction and the 1/16” fine mesh fraction. The fine mesh sample yielded larger numbers of bones identified, and a small but statistically significant difference in proportions of different fish groups. Given the high cost of recovery, sorting, and analysis of 1/16” samples, I recommend that it be used for only a small sample at shell midden sites like 45KP233 in the Salish Sea.

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