Title

"Soon speeds the morning light proclaiming" from The Magic Flute

Presenter Information

Kristina McLean

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom D

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) was a musical prodigy and an influential composer of the Classical era, accomplished on the violin and keyboard and composing by the age of five. During his final year, he composed The Magic Flute. It was so highly received that it reached hundreds of performances and is one of the most performed operas to date. The opera follows Tamino as he journeys through the realm of the evil Queen of the Night and falls in love with her daughter, Pamina. The Queen enlists Tamino's help in regaining her daughter from the hands of her enemy, Sarastro. Pamina learns that help is coming and falls in love with Tamino. Tamino then undergoes many challenges in the hope of soon finding and rescuing Pamina. In the second act, three spirits see a distraught Pamina attempting to commit suicide because she believes Tamino has abandoned her. They restrain her and take away her dagger, promising that she will see him soon, restoring in her a hope for rescue and love (*Soon speeds the morning light proclaiming*). Performing scenes like this requires more work than just learning the notes and memorizing the words. The musicians must learn the parts of everyone else while still maintaining a separate identity within the ensemble. They must empathize with and bring to life these *paper*characters in order to engage the audience and share that ethereal quality which is music.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Gayla Blaisdell

Additional Mentoring Department

Music

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May 17th, 10:20 AM May 17th, 10:40 AM

"Soon speeds the morning light proclaiming" from The Magic Flute

SURC Ballroom D

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) was a musical prodigy and an influential composer of the Classical era, accomplished on the violin and keyboard and composing by the age of five. During his final year, he composed The Magic Flute. It was so highly received that it reached hundreds of performances and is one of the most performed operas to date. The opera follows Tamino as he journeys through the realm of the evil Queen of the Night and falls in love with her daughter, Pamina. The Queen enlists Tamino's help in regaining her daughter from the hands of her enemy, Sarastro. Pamina learns that help is coming and falls in love with Tamino. Tamino then undergoes many challenges in the hope of soon finding and rescuing Pamina. In the second act, three spirits see a distraught Pamina attempting to commit suicide because she believes Tamino has abandoned her. They restrain her and take away her dagger, promising that she will see him soon, restoring in her a hope for rescue and love (*Soon speeds the morning light proclaiming*). Performing scenes like this requires more work than just learning the notes and memorizing the words. The musicians must learn the parts of everyone else while still maintaining a separate identity within the ensemble. They must empathize with and bring to life these *paper*characters in order to engage the audience and share that ethereal quality which is music.