Title

Tent Cities are normal before Black Friday.

Presenter Information

Charles Velasquez

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom D

Start Date

26-5-2012

End Date

26-5-2012

Abstract

It's okay for groups of people to squat in public areas outside retail stores before a big sales event, but it is not okay for people to squat in anyone place for too long if they do not have a place to live. It is Ironic that those with intentions of shopping based on their economic ability to do so also get the benefit of the doubt when allowed to squat outside. In this piece I point out how similar different types of people could look when they all spend a little time camping on the streets. The homeless man gets mistaken for an extremely dedicated bargain shopper. Despite his uniquely weird situation he has found interesting ways to capitalize. The homeless man finds different things important than those in his social proximity. Food and shelter are much more important than a position in line, but judging by the evolution of acceptable competitive shopping in our society one might begin to question it. Couple this with competitive shopper advertisement and encouragement and we get hysterical behavior by all those who attend. The idea that this could be possible brings a slightly reluctant smile to my face. It is kind of funny ;)

Faculty Mentor(s)

Charles Velasquez

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May 26th, 4:10 PM May 26th, 5:30 PM

Tent Cities are normal before Black Friday.

SURC Ballroom D

It's okay for groups of people to squat in public areas outside retail stores before a big sales event, but it is not okay for people to squat in anyone place for too long if they do not have a place to live. It is Ironic that those with intentions of shopping based on their economic ability to do so also get the benefit of the doubt when allowed to squat outside. In this piece I point out how similar different types of people could look when they all spend a little time camping on the streets. The homeless man gets mistaken for an extremely dedicated bargain shopper. Despite his uniquely weird situation he has found interesting ways to capitalize. The homeless man finds different things important than those in his social proximity. Food and shelter are much more important than a position in line, but judging by the evolution of acceptable competitive shopping in our society one might begin to question it. Couple this with competitive shopper advertisement and encouragement and we get hysterical behavior by all those who attend. The idea that this could be possible brings a slightly reluctant smile to my face. It is kind of funny ;)