Title

Working memory: an investigation of the effect of auditory and visual presentation on immediate serial recall.

Presenter Information

Crystal Pelkey

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

Des Moines

Start Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

The multi-component model of working memory can be broken down into four sections, one of which includes the phonological loop. The phonological loop processes language based information. It is thought that language based information is allowed direct or indirect access to the phonological loop depending on whether it is seen or heard. It was hypothesized that while concurrently articulating a word, lists of words that were seen would be recalled more accurately than lists of words that were heard. Undergraduate students participated in two experimental conditions, in which they were presented with list of words that were heard and list of words that they read, all while concurrently articulating. After the presentation of the word lists, the participants were asked to recall the list of words in the order that they were presented. It was found that those who saw the words recalled more accurately than those who read words. This is thought to be caused by the act of concurrent articulation while trying to rehearse a word list, conflicting more with the heard words than with the seen words, thus preventing access to the phonological loop for the heard words. This coincides with previous research suggesting that there is a difference in the way seen vs. heard words are given access to the phonological loop. Ultimately these results point to the importance of understanding the limited attentional resources available in how much and what types of information can be processed simultaneously in working memory.

Poster Number

1

Faculty Mentor(s)

Danielle Polage

Additional Mentoring Department

Psychology

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May 17th, 12:00 PM

Working memory: an investigation of the effect of auditory and visual presentation on immediate serial recall.

Des Moines

The multi-component model of working memory can be broken down into four sections, one of which includes the phonological loop. The phonological loop processes language based information. It is thought that language based information is allowed direct or indirect access to the phonological loop depending on whether it is seen or heard. It was hypothesized that while concurrently articulating a word, lists of words that were seen would be recalled more accurately than lists of words that were heard. Undergraduate students participated in two experimental conditions, in which they were presented with list of words that were heard and list of words that they read, all while concurrently articulating. After the presentation of the word lists, the participants were asked to recall the list of words in the order that they were presented. It was found that those who saw the words recalled more accurately than those who read words. This is thought to be caused by the act of concurrent articulation while trying to rehearse a word list, conflicting more with the heard words than with the seen words, thus preventing access to the phonological loop for the heard words. This coincides with previous research suggesting that there is a difference in the way seen vs. heard words are given access to the phonological loop. Ultimately these results point to the importance of understanding the limited attentional resources available in how much and what types of information can be processed simultaneously in working memory.