Title

Three Views of a Woman: Using Hatshepsut as a Lens Through Which to Examine Gender.

Presenter Information

Jesse Hegstrom Oakey

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 137A

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

In order to study Hatshepsut, the female ruler of ancient Egypt, one must not only study her within the context of her own culture, but must also understand the views of the early archeologists who discovered her. Because of the respective cultures of the early archeologists, many misconceptions about Hatshepsut’s life arose �" such as perceptions of her as a usurper to the throne, or the idea that her erasure from history was brought on because of her gender. More recently new evidence has arisen that disproves many of these misconceptions. The three views together �" that of the early archeologists, that of the ancient Egyptians, and contemporary views of her today �" create a fascinating lens through which to study perceptions of gender. What does studying Hatshepsut tell us about the Egyptians’ and the early archeologists’ ideas of women? What does it say about our own views? How do the three compare?

Faculty Mentor(s)

Ruthi Erdman

Additional Mentoring Department

English

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May 17th, 1:50 PM May 17th, 2:10 PM

Three Views of a Woman: Using Hatshepsut as a Lens Through Which to Examine Gender.

SURC 137A

In order to study Hatshepsut, the female ruler of ancient Egypt, one must not only study her within the context of her own culture, but must also understand the views of the early archeologists who discovered her. Because of the respective cultures of the early archeologists, many misconceptions about Hatshepsut’s life arose �" such as perceptions of her as a usurper to the throne, or the idea that her erasure from history was brought on because of her gender. More recently new evidence has arisen that disproves many of these misconceptions. The three views together �" that of the early archeologists, that of the ancient Egyptians, and contemporary views of her today �" create a fascinating lens through which to study perceptions of gender. What does studying Hatshepsut tell us about the Egyptians’ and the early archeologists’ ideas of women? What does it say about our own views? How do the three compare?