Title

Reproductive Biology of Anodonta californiensis in the Yakima River Basin

Presenter Information

Alexa Maine

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 137B

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

The importance of freshwater mussels in stream ecosystems is apparent in their remarkable ability to effectively cycle nutrients and improve water quality. Listed as a federal species of concern and a candidate species for listing in the state of Washington, the California Floater (Anodonta californiensis) mussel has potentially significant ecological benefits. This study identifies a suite of suitable host fish species for this mussel, filling a significant data gap for A. californiensis and building a pathway for successful conservation efforts. Using a combination of artificial larval infection of potential host fish in a laboratory setting and field observation techniques, two fish species, speckled dace (Rhinichthys osculus) and torrent sculpin (Cottus rhotheus), were confirmed as hosts for A. californiensis. Two more fish species, three-spine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) and Redside Shiner (Richardsonius balteatus), were identified as potential hosts for A. californiensis, but confirming either species as a host will require further tests. Previous conservation efforts for A. californiensis may have fallen short without the knowledge of suitable host fish; however, the information obtained from this study can help to develop a holistic watershed management approach that focuses on A. californiensis and its suite of fish hosts in a community context rather than a species-specific strategy.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Clay Arango

Additional Mentoring Department

Biological Sciences

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May 17th, 2:40 PM May 17th, 3:00 PM

Reproductive Biology of Anodonta californiensis in the Yakima River Basin

SURC 137B

The importance of freshwater mussels in stream ecosystems is apparent in their remarkable ability to effectively cycle nutrients and improve water quality. Listed as a federal species of concern and a candidate species for listing in the state of Washington, the California Floater (Anodonta californiensis) mussel has potentially significant ecological benefits. This study identifies a suite of suitable host fish species for this mussel, filling a significant data gap for A. californiensis and building a pathway for successful conservation efforts. Using a combination of artificial larval infection of potential host fish in a laboratory setting and field observation techniques, two fish species, speckled dace (Rhinichthys osculus) and torrent sculpin (Cottus rhotheus), were confirmed as hosts for A. californiensis. Two more fish species, three-spine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) and Redside Shiner (Richardsonius balteatus), were identified as potential hosts for A. californiensis, but confirming either species as a host will require further tests. Previous conservation efforts for A. californiensis may have fallen short without the knowledge of suitable host fish; however, the information obtained from this study can help to develop a holistic watershed management approach that focuses on A. californiensis and its suite of fish hosts in a community context rather than a species-specific strategy.