Title

FAR INFRARED LASER LINES PRODUCED FROM AN OPTICALLY PUMPED MOLECULAR LASER

Presenter Information

Robert Holman
Rolf Minton
Henrique Alves

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 137B

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

LASER is an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Initially dubbed “the solution in search of a problem,” the laser was originally invented with no specific application in mind. Since its invention in 1960, the laser has been a significant asset to society with its countless applications in science, technology, and beyond. Today, some of its practical uses include checkout scanners, laser cutting and welding, along with defense and medical applications, such as LASIK surgery. Lasers have even found their way into the entertainment industry. One of the laser project’s at Central Washington University involves the discovery of new sources of light in the far-infrared region, defined as spanning wavelengths from 30 to 1000 micron. For this project, a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser was used to excite the medium in a recently constructed far-infrared laser cavity. This new laser cavity was evaluated using either CH3OH, CH3OD, CH2F2, CD3OH, CD3I, HCOOH, or H13COOH as the far-infrared laser medium. Using these various media, 140 laser lines were generated with our experimental system, ranging from 41.4 to 1136.2 micron. Of the 140 laser lines we detected, fourteen were new. This presentation will focus on discussing the experimental system and the process involved in the discovery of far-infrared laser lines.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Michael Jackson

Additional Mentoring Department

Physics

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May 17th, 3:20 PM May 17th, 3:40 PM

FAR INFRARED LASER LINES PRODUCED FROM AN OPTICALLY PUMPED MOLECULAR LASER

SURC 137B

LASER is an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Initially dubbed “the solution in search of a problem,” the laser was originally invented with no specific application in mind. Since its invention in 1960, the laser has been a significant asset to society with its countless applications in science, technology, and beyond. Today, some of its practical uses include checkout scanners, laser cutting and welding, along with defense and medical applications, such as LASIK surgery. Lasers have even found their way into the entertainment industry. One of the laser project’s at Central Washington University involves the discovery of new sources of light in the far-infrared region, defined as spanning wavelengths from 30 to 1000 micron. For this project, a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser was used to excite the medium in a recently constructed far-infrared laser cavity. This new laser cavity was evaluated using either CH3OH, CH3OD, CH2F2, CD3OH, CD3I, HCOOH, or H13COOH as the far-infrared laser medium. Using these various media, 140 laser lines were generated with our experimental system, ranging from 41.4 to 1136.2 micron. Of the 140 laser lines we detected, fourteen were new. This presentation will focus on discussing the experimental system and the process involved in the discovery of far-infrared laser lines.