Title

“Glaciation in the Wenatchee Mountains, Washington State”

Presenter Information

Brad Collins

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 271

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

The Wenatchee Mountains, an outlier of the Cascade Range, show evidence of previous glaciation. However, no research had previously been done on glaciation in the area. I examined cirque floor elevation, cirque aspect and cirque development with distance from the Cascade Crest in the Wenatchee Mountains. Data was gathered using a combination of Forest Service aerial photographs viewed in stereo, USGS topographic maps, and cross referencing interpretations with Google Earth. Cirques were digitized into ArcGIS so information could be stored in a geo-database, and so cirque distribution may be viewed more clearly. In total, 93 cirques were identified and recorded in the study area, with the mean and median cirque floor elevation being 5,923 feet and 5,940 feet respectively. Cirque floor elevations appear to rise eastward; however, statistical analysis of the data showed that this pattern is not significant. Average cirque floor elevations are 85 feet lower in northern drainages than in southern drainages; however, a difference of means test indicates this number not to be significant. Cirque aspects were highest in frequency to the north east with a median aspect of 80˚, paralleling previous studies on cirque morphometry; however, there was no significant correlation between aspect and cirque floor elevation. This study concluded that while cirque characteristics suggest similar patterns associated to North American mountains, more data over a larger area would strengthen statistical results.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Karl Lillquist

Additional Mentoring Department

Geography

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May 17th, 10:00 AM May 17th, 10:20 AM

“Glaciation in the Wenatchee Mountains, Washington State”

SURC 271

The Wenatchee Mountains, an outlier of the Cascade Range, show evidence of previous glaciation. However, no research had previously been done on glaciation in the area. I examined cirque floor elevation, cirque aspect and cirque development with distance from the Cascade Crest in the Wenatchee Mountains. Data was gathered using a combination of Forest Service aerial photographs viewed in stereo, USGS topographic maps, and cross referencing interpretations with Google Earth. Cirques were digitized into ArcGIS so information could be stored in a geo-database, and so cirque distribution may be viewed more clearly. In total, 93 cirques were identified and recorded in the study area, with the mean and median cirque floor elevation being 5,923 feet and 5,940 feet respectively. Cirque floor elevations appear to rise eastward; however, statistical analysis of the data showed that this pattern is not significant. Average cirque floor elevations are 85 feet lower in northern drainages than in southern drainages; however, a difference of means test indicates this number not to be significant. Cirque aspects were highest in frequency to the north east with a median aspect of 80˚, paralleling previous studies on cirque morphometry; however, there was no significant correlation between aspect and cirque floor elevation. This study concluded that while cirque characteristics suggest similar patterns associated to North American mountains, more data over a larger area would strengthen statistical results.