Title

The Effect of Post Exercise Cocoa Consumption on Muscle Soreness and Endurance Running Performance Following Downhill Treadmill Running

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 135

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

Athletes are constantly searching for the optimal nutritional recovery aid. This study examined the effectiveness of cocoa-flavanols (CocoaCHOC) compared to chocolate milk (CHOC) on markers of muscle recovery, and exercise performance following exercise induced muscle soreness. (N=8) Endurance trained male athletes (Vo2max: 64.35 + 7.60 mL/kg/min) completed a downhill running protocol to induce muscle soreness. Participants consumed 1.0 g of carbohydrate per kilogram of bodyweight (1g CHO/kg BW) of a randomly assigned beverage (CHOC vs. CocoaCHOC) immediately after the downhill run and again 2h later. Participants returned to the lab 48h later to complete a 5K timed trial. Creatine kinase (CK) and subjective measurements of muscle soreness were taken at baseline, 24h, and 48h post the downhill running session. The same protocol was repeated 3 weeks later with the other beverage. A 1-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed no significant difference (p = 0.97) between trials for 5K time. No significant difference (p = 0.30) was found for creatine kinase (CK) levels between treatment groups. These findings suggest that the addition of cocoa flavanols to a post exercise recovery beverage offers no additional recovery benefits when consumed acutely for endurance runners.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Kelly Pritchett

Additional Mentoring Department

Nutrition, Exercise, and Health Science

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The Effect of Post Exercise Cocoa Consumption on Muscle Soreness and Endurance Running Performance Following Downhill Treadmill Running

SURC 135

Athletes are constantly searching for the optimal nutritional recovery aid. This study examined the effectiveness of cocoa-flavanols (CocoaCHOC) compared to chocolate milk (CHOC) on markers of muscle recovery, and exercise performance following exercise induced muscle soreness. (N=8) Endurance trained male athletes (Vo2max: 64.35 + 7.60 mL/kg/min) completed a downhill running protocol to induce muscle soreness. Participants consumed 1.0 g of carbohydrate per kilogram of bodyweight (1g CHO/kg BW) of a randomly assigned beverage (CHOC vs. CocoaCHOC) immediately after the downhill run and again 2h later. Participants returned to the lab 48h later to complete a 5K timed trial. Creatine kinase (CK) and subjective measurements of muscle soreness were taken at baseline, 24h, and 48h post the downhill running session. The same protocol was repeated 3 weeks later with the other beverage. A 1-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed no significant difference (p = 0.97) between trials for 5K time. No significant difference (p = 0.30) was found for creatine kinase (CK) levels between treatment groups. These findings suggest that the addition of cocoa flavanols to a post exercise recovery beverage offers no additional recovery benefits when consumed acutely for endurance runners.