Title

Music is the Voice

Presenter Information

David Hoffman

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 301

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

Music becomes a voice for people. Not just individuals, but for whole generations. Music expresses the emotion that people of a certain culture and particular time period are feeling, and by doing so, music unites them. I am looking at the philosophy of music, mainly Peter Kivy's formal interpretation of emotional expressiveness in music. Kivy maintains that music is not able to express a garden variety of emotion to the listener. What moves us is the form and structure of the music. If this theory holds true, then, it does not account for historical relativism and music for the generation. I am looking deeper into how music becomes the voice of a generation. To do so I must acknowledge that Kivy's theory has flaws and look at a theory that can account for this phenomenon, that being, emotivism.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Matthew Altman

Additional Mentoring Department

Philosophy and Religious Studies

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May 17th, 10:20 AM May 17th, 10:40 AM

Music is the Voice

SURC 301

Music becomes a voice for people. Not just individuals, but for whole generations. Music expresses the emotion that people of a certain culture and particular time period are feeling, and by doing so, music unites them. I am looking at the philosophy of music, mainly Peter Kivy's formal interpretation of emotional expressiveness in music. Kivy maintains that music is not able to express a garden variety of emotion to the listener. What moves us is the form and structure of the music. If this theory holds true, then, it does not account for historical relativism and music for the generation. I am looking deeper into how music becomes the voice of a generation. To do so I must acknowledge that Kivy's theory has flaws and look at a theory that can account for this phenomenon, that being, emotivism.