Title

Identifying Missing and Unidentified Persons: A New Methodology

Presenter Information

Andrea Blume

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 301

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

The challenges in Washington State for missing and unidentified persons are complex and part of a national problem. The National Institute of Justice estimates that there are 40,000 unidentified remains in the United States and that there are as many as 100,000 active missing person’s cases at any given time (National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, 2011). My project study will identify how many additional missing and unidentified person cases there are by compiling the databases of the private and other governmental run databases to Washington State’s database. From these comprehensive comparisons, I will identify the Washington cases that are not in our State’s database or the National database. I will also identify the Washington cases that lack dental, DNA and family reference DNA submissions, which like other states, contribute to the growing number of unidentified remains across the nation. From there, law enforcement agencies will be given the data to update their system which ultimately uploads into the state system. By identifying the cases specific to the agencies that lack DNA and Dental, it will bring awareness to each case of what samples are still needed in order to give these cases the best chance they have for identification and recovery.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Charles Reasons

Additional Mentoring Department

Law and Justice

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May 17th, 8:30 AM May 17th, 8:50 AM

Identifying Missing and Unidentified Persons: A New Methodology

SURC 301

The challenges in Washington State for missing and unidentified persons are complex and part of a national problem. The National Institute of Justice estimates that there are 40,000 unidentified remains in the United States and that there are as many as 100,000 active missing person’s cases at any given time (National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, 2011). My project study will identify how many additional missing and unidentified person cases there are by compiling the databases of the private and other governmental run databases to Washington State’s database. From these comprehensive comparisons, I will identify the Washington cases that are not in our State’s database or the National database. I will also identify the Washington cases that lack dental, DNA and family reference DNA submissions, which like other states, contribute to the growing number of unidentified remains across the nation. From there, law enforcement agencies will be given the data to update their system which ultimately uploads into the state system. By identifying the cases specific to the agencies that lack DNA and Dental, it will bring awareness to each case of what samples are still needed in order to give these cases the best chance they have for identification and recovery.