Title

A Heroine Whom No-one Will Much Like: The Redemption of Emma Woodhouse

Presenter Information

Jessica Van Mersbergen

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 137B

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

Of all the heroines of all of the celebrated novels of Jane Austen, Emma Woodhouse is arguably the most controversial; the majority of readers either loves or hates the eponymous young belle of Jane Austen’s Emma, with no small fraction of them tending toward the side of animosity. “A Heroine Whom No-one Will Much Like: The Redemption of Emma Woodhouse” aims to prove that, although Miss Woodhouse initially seems manipulative and inconsiderate, her generally flawed nature serves a purpose in terms of Austen’s ability to tell the story, and to further illustrate that there is more to Emma Woodhouse than meets the eye. After studying in-depth the heroine’s negatively portrayed character, the essay argues for the acknowledgement of Emma’s redeeming qualities and evidence of reformation by the end of the novel.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Christine Sutphin

Additional Mentoring Department

English

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May 17th, 8:30 AM May 17th, 8:50 AM

A Heroine Whom No-one Will Much Like: The Redemption of Emma Woodhouse

SURC 137B

Of all the heroines of all of the celebrated novels of Jane Austen, Emma Woodhouse is arguably the most controversial; the majority of readers either loves or hates the eponymous young belle of Jane Austen’s Emma, with no small fraction of them tending toward the side of animosity. “A Heroine Whom No-one Will Much Like: The Redemption of Emma Woodhouse” aims to prove that, although Miss Woodhouse initially seems manipulative and inconsiderate, her generally flawed nature serves a purpose in terms of Austen’s ability to tell the story, and to further illustrate that there is more to Emma Woodhouse than meets the eye. After studying in-depth the heroine’s negatively portrayed character, the essay argues for the acknowledgement of Emma’s redeeming qualities and evidence of reformation by the end of the novel.