Title

Assay Protocol Development For Maintaining Life In Vitro Of Ancylostoma ceylanicum

Presenter Information

Sarah McNutt

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 201

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

Hookworm infections are one of the most common in the world, infecting over 600 million people worldwide, mainly in impoverished areas. The current major approach to treating hookworm is periodic deworming with benzimidazoles. However, the frequent treatment of populations with this drug has lead to a serious problem of drug resistance which is largely irreversible. Thus, efforts are moving towards developing new drugs and vaccines. We successfully developed a series of assays for the purpose to be able to test the anthelmintic effect, defined as the ability of test samples to kill helminth worms, of certain plant extracts. We removed worms on day one, performed a series of washes with mediums, and then incubated overnight. The next day, we took the surviving worms and placed with increasing concentrations of the testable material (fetal calf serum, DMSO, etc). Our assay maintained a 40% overnight survival rate of hookworm, which successfully allows live worms further available for drug testing. With this protocol set up, we will be testing the anthelmintic effect of organic compounds extracted from the plants Oemleria cerasiformis, Adenocaulon bicolor, Dais cotinifolia, Collomia grandiflora.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Blaise Dondji

Additional Mentoring Department

Biological Sciences

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May 17th, 11:40 AM May 17th, 12:00 PM

Assay Protocol Development For Maintaining Life In Vitro Of Ancylostoma ceylanicum

SURC 201

Hookworm infections are one of the most common in the world, infecting over 600 million people worldwide, mainly in impoverished areas. The current major approach to treating hookworm is periodic deworming with benzimidazoles. However, the frequent treatment of populations with this drug has lead to a serious problem of drug resistance which is largely irreversible. Thus, efforts are moving towards developing new drugs and vaccines. We successfully developed a series of assays for the purpose to be able to test the anthelmintic effect, defined as the ability of test samples to kill helminth worms, of certain plant extracts. We removed worms on day one, performed a series of washes with mediums, and then incubated overnight. The next day, we took the surviving worms and placed with increasing concentrations of the testable material (fetal calf serum, DMSO, etc). Our assay maintained a 40% overnight survival rate of hookworm, which successfully allows live worms further available for drug testing. With this protocol set up, we will be testing the anthelmintic effect of organic compounds extracted from the plants Oemleria cerasiformis, Adenocaulon bicolor, Dais cotinifolia, Collomia grandiflora.