Title

Academic English as L2: Effectiveness of Modeling and Noticing

Presenter Information

Kristine Kienast

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 135

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

Academic writing, that language of the elite, the powerful, the educated �" we expect it from freshman college students almost immediately upon matriculation. But to many entering students, academic writing is almost another language, requiring a unique vocabulary and syntax. In the field of Second Language Acquisition (SLA), these students would be considered L2’s, meaning that academic writing is a “second language.” With this view in mind, composition instructors should be compelled to find effective ways to teach academic writing, especially as the demographics of the student population change over time. The question, then, is if academic writing can be viewed as a second language, what are effective ways to bring students to fluency in that L2 of academic writing? Incorporating research in both composition studies and SLA, I will explore how both “modeling” and “noticing” may be used to increase fluency in academic writing and examine the interrelatedness of the two approaches.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Patsy Callaghan

Additional Mentoring Department

English

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May 17th, 1:30 PM May 17th, 1:50 PM

Academic English as L2: Effectiveness of Modeling and Noticing

SURC 135

Academic writing, that language of the elite, the powerful, the educated �" we expect it from freshman college students almost immediately upon matriculation. But to many entering students, academic writing is almost another language, requiring a unique vocabulary and syntax. In the field of Second Language Acquisition (SLA), these students would be considered L2’s, meaning that academic writing is a “second language.” With this view in mind, composition instructors should be compelled to find effective ways to teach academic writing, especially as the demographics of the student population change over time. The question, then, is if academic writing can be viewed as a second language, what are effective ways to bring students to fluency in that L2 of academic writing? Incorporating research in both composition studies and SLA, I will explore how both “modeling” and “noticing” may be used to increase fluency in academic writing and examine the interrelatedness of the two approaches.