Title

Selection of cold-tolerant Arthrospira platensis strains by way of cold-shock treatments

Presenter Information

Alan McNolty

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 202

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

Arthrospira platensis is an alga that shows great promise as a human food source. It is rich in nutrients and both simple and inexpensive to cultivate. However, A. platensis requires relatively high temperatures for optimal growth: around 30oC. If a strain of A. platensis that is capable of growing in even slightly lower temperatures was developed it would have great potential as a source of nutrition for impoverished regions as well and increased yields for commercial growing operations. The goal of this project is to explore the possibility of developing a cold-tolerant strain of A. platensis using periodic exposure to low temperatures. Growth rates at less than optimal temperatures will be compared for survivors of a short-term cold shock versus control strains. If the cold-shocked strain shows enhanced growth under sub-optimal temperature as compared to the control strain, this will indicate that cold-tolerant strains of A. platensis have been successfully selected.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Mary Poulson, Jennifer Dechaine

Additional Mentoring Department

Biological Sciences

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May 17th, 1:30 PM May 17th, 1:50 PM

Selection of cold-tolerant Arthrospira platensis strains by way of cold-shock treatments

SURC 202

Arthrospira platensis is an alga that shows great promise as a human food source. It is rich in nutrients and both simple and inexpensive to cultivate. However, A. platensis requires relatively high temperatures for optimal growth: around 30oC. If a strain of A. platensis that is capable of growing in even slightly lower temperatures was developed it would have great potential as a source of nutrition for impoverished regions as well and increased yields for commercial growing operations. The goal of this project is to explore the possibility of developing a cold-tolerant strain of A. platensis using periodic exposure to low temperatures. Growth rates at less than optimal temperatures will be compared for survivors of a short-term cold shock versus control strains. If the cold-shocked strain shows enhanced growth under sub-optimal temperature as compared to the control strain, this will indicate that cold-tolerant strains of A. platensis have been successfully selected.