Title

Multigenerational analysis of selection on domestication traits in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) crop-wild hybrids

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom A

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

In recent years, one of the most controversial public policy issues has been the commercialization of genetically engineered (GE) crops. One concern is that harmful transgenes could escape into wild populations through hybridization with GE crop plants. Although crop-wild hybridization readily occurs throughout the range of many cultivated species, whether a crop allele will persist in the wild is determined by its selective advantage. Understanding what cultivar traits are advantageous in natural environments over multiple generations is an initial step to predicating the relative risk of transgenes. Replicates of 171 F6-F8 recombinant inbred line sunflowers (Helianthus annuus) were exposed to three generations of selection under natural conditions in the field followed by a common garden experiment comparing phenotypic changes between the first and third generations. The first generation was planted in spring of 2007 in Fargo, ND and the following generations were seeded according to the reproductive output of the maternal plant. Known phenotypic indicators of domestication were measured within each generation. Selection favored earlier flowering, larger flowering disks, more heads, taller plants, and more leaves in at least two generations for each trait. In accordance with these results, plants were significantly taller and had more leaves and heads after three generations in the field. In contrast to selection, plants flowered later and had smaller flowering disks in generation three than generation one. These results suggest that domestication traits were generally disadvantageous in natural conditions and would not be expected to establish in wild populations.

Poster Number

9

Faculty Mentor(s)

Jennifer Dechaine

Additional Mentoring Department

Biological Sciences

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 17th, 8:30 AM May 17th, 11:00 AM

Multigenerational analysis of selection on domestication traits in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) crop-wild hybrids

SURC Ballroom A

In recent years, one of the most controversial public policy issues has been the commercialization of genetically engineered (GE) crops. One concern is that harmful transgenes could escape into wild populations through hybridization with GE crop plants. Although crop-wild hybridization readily occurs throughout the range of many cultivated species, whether a crop allele will persist in the wild is determined by its selective advantage. Understanding what cultivar traits are advantageous in natural environments over multiple generations is an initial step to predicating the relative risk of transgenes. Replicates of 171 F6-F8 recombinant inbred line sunflowers (Helianthus annuus) were exposed to three generations of selection under natural conditions in the field followed by a common garden experiment comparing phenotypic changes between the first and third generations. The first generation was planted in spring of 2007 in Fargo, ND and the following generations were seeded according to the reproductive output of the maternal plant. Known phenotypic indicators of domestication were measured within each generation. Selection favored earlier flowering, larger flowering disks, more heads, taller plants, and more leaves in at least two generations for each trait. In accordance with these results, plants were significantly taller and had more leaves and heads after three generations in the field. In contrast to selection, plants flowered later and had smaller flowering disks in generation three than generation one. These results suggest that domestication traits were generally disadvantageous in natural conditions and would not be expected to establish in wild populations.