Title

Lying Words

Presenter Information

Charlie Spears

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom A

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

Lying is a common occurrence in everyday life. Everyone lies. In extreme cases, it is important to be able to determine if someone is lying or if they are telling the truth. With an increase in threats to national security, it is essential to investigate potential cues to deception. When people lie they are using more cognitive resources than compared to telling the truth and they are creating details, opinions, or an event that did not happen. As a result, false stories may differ qualitatively from true stories. The current research discriminates liars from truth tellers by the words they use. The hypothesis is that those telling a lie use fewer first person singular pronouns (e.g., I, me, my), more negative emotion words (e.g., hate, anger, enemy), fewer exclusive words (e.g., but, except, without) and more motion verbs (e.g., walk, move, go).

Poster Number

26

Faculty Mentor(s)

Danielle Polage

Additional Mentoring Department

Psychology

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May 17th, 2:00 PM May 17th, 4:30 PM

Lying Words

SURC Ballroom A

Lying is a common occurrence in everyday life. Everyone lies. In extreme cases, it is important to be able to determine if someone is lying or if they are telling the truth. With an increase in threats to national security, it is essential to investigate potential cues to deception. When people lie they are using more cognitive resources than compared to telling the truth and they are creating details, opinions, or an event that did not happen. As a result, false stories may differ qualitatively from true stories. The current research discriminates liars from truth tellers by the words they use. The hypothesis is that those telling a lie use fewer first person singular pronouns (e.g., I, me, my), more negative emotion words (e.g., hate, anger, enemy), fewer exclusive words (e.g., but, except, without) and more motion verbs (e.g., walk, move, go).