Title

Rosa Rockshelter Archaeological Site: A History of Investigations

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom A

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

Rosa Rockshelter is located in Yakima County, Washington, approximately 1.6 miles south of the Rosa Dam on the Yakima River. Dr. William C. Smith of Central Washington University excavated the site in 1970 as a summer fieldschool. Rosa Rockshelter, 45YK30l, was most likely occupied during the Cayuse Phase (100 B.C. �" A.D. 1850), and utilized for the storage of various perishable materials. The site produced a relatively abundant and varied assemblage of well-preserved cordage materials of tule, dogbane, cedar, and sagebrush. Textile fragments of S and Z twist cordage, tule matting, and basketry are the basis of ongoing research from both scientific and traditional cultural perspectives. This poster looks at the 1970 excavation project and the unique artifacts that were found; it discusses current research questions, efforts to curate the collection, and describes the upcoming field investigations planned for 2012.

Poster Number

40

Faculty Mentor(s)

Shane Scott, Steven Hackenberger

Additional Mentoring Department

Anthropology

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May 17th, 8:30 AM May 17th, 11:00 AM

Rosa Rockshelter Archaeological Site: A History of Investigations

SURC Ballroom A

Rosa Rockshelter is located in Yakima County, Washington, approximately 1.6 miles south of the Rosa Dam on the Yakima River. Dr. William C. Smith of Central Washington University excavated the site in 1970 as a summer fieldschool. Rosa Rockshelter, 45YK30l, was most likely occupied during the Cayuse Phase (100 B.C. �" A.D. 1850), and utilized for the storage of various perishable materials. The site produced a relatively abundant and varied assemblage of well-preserved cordage materials of tule, dogbane, cedar, and sagebrush. Textile fragments of S and Z twist cordage, tule matting, and basketry are the basis of ongoing research from both scientific and traditional cultural perspectives. This poster looks at the 1970 excavation project and the unique artifacts that were found; it discusses current research questions, efforts to curate the collection, and describes the upcoming field investigations planned for 2012.