Title

Investigation of Salvia columbariae for Dopamine Receptor Related Activity

Presenter Information

Logan Bell

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom A

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

The plant Salvia columbariae is native to Western California, Utah, and ranges south to Northern Mexico. It has been used historically by indigenous peoples as a dietary supplement and a medicinal herb. A relative of S. columbariae is S. divinorum which is used as a recreational drug and has known opioid receptor binding activity. Prior work with extracts of S. columbariae revealed diterpenes to be present in the plant. A large scale extraction has been done and the crude extract does exhibit moderate dopamine receptor binding activity. We have used techniques such as vacuum liquid chromatography (VLC) and Sephadex LH-20 to purify, and thin-layer chromatography (TLC) for ongoing analysis. Future plans are to further refine these materials to purity, and to get more biological testing done. We hope to see if there is dopamine receptor activity in pure compounds for potential applications to Parkinson’s disease, for which there is currently no cure.

Poster Number

21

Faculty Mentor(s)

Gil Belofsky

Additional Mentoring Department

Chemistry

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May 17th, 8:30 AM May 17th, 11:00 AM

Investigation of Salvia columbariae for Dopamine Receptor Related Activity

SURC Ballroom A

The plant Salvia columbariae is native to Western California, Utah, and ranges south to Northern Mexico. It has been used historically by indigenous peoples as a dietary supplement and a medicinal herb. A relative of S. columbariae is S. divinorum which is used as a recreational drug and has known opioid receptor binding activity. Prior work with extracts of S. columbariae revealed diterpenes to be present in the plant. A large scale extraction has been done and the crude extract does exhibit moderate dopamine receptor binding activity. We have used techniques such as vacuum liquid chromatography (VLC) and Sephadex LH-20 to purify, and thin-layer chromatography (TLC) for ongoing analysis. Future plans are to further refine these materials to purity, and to get more biological testing done. We hope to see if there is dopamine receptor activity in pure compounds for potential applications to Parkinson’s disease, for which there is currently no cure.