Title

Views of Pre-service Teachers and School Law

Presenter Information

Kelly Benson
Jan Byers-Kirsch

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom A

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

Topic This study sought to ascertain the perceptions of pre-service teachers in P-12 education enrolled in a school law course and students enrolled in student teaching at a large Washington state university. The purpose of the study was to shed light on the perceptions of students prior to accepting their first teaching assignment. Question Qualitative and quantitative methodologies were utilized to address “What are pre-service teacher’s perceptions of school law?” Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate the participant responses. Evidence Two groups of students were electronically surveyed; one group enrolled in an undergraduate school law class and another group who completed the law course and were student teaching. Of those students enrolled in the education law course (n= 25), 12 responded or 48%. Of those students whom had taken the education law course and were student teaching (n=217), only 16.5% responded. Conclusions This study began the foundational work to enlighten our profession with regard to the perceptions of pre-service teachers’ knowledge of school law. When looking at the results, the majority of questions were answered correctly by students enrolled in the educational law course on areas covering student/teacher rights, religion, child abuse, copyright law, and special services. Areas where both groups scored high were student rights, child abuse reporting, electronic media, special services, teacher rights. Areas where both scored low included teacher contracts, freedom of speech, parent rights, extra-curricular drug testing, and curriculum. All pre-service teachers reported the education law class as beneficial to becoming a teacher.

Poster Number

18

Faculty Mentor(s)

Kelly Benson

Additional Mentoring Department

Education

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May 17th, 11:15 AM May 17th, 1:44 PM

Views of Pre-service Teachers and School Law

SURC Ballroom A

Topic This study sought to ascertain the perceptions of pre-service teachers in P-12 education enrolled in a school law course and students enrolled in student teaching at a large Washington state university. The purpose of the study was to shed light on the perceptions of students prior to accepting their first teaching assignment. Question Qualitative and quantitative methodologies were utilized to address “What are pre-service teacher’s perceptions of school law?” Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate the participant responses. Evidence Two groups of students were electronically surveyed; one group enrolled in an undergraduate school law class and another group who completed the law course and were student teaching. Of those students enrolled in the education law course (n= 25), 12 responded or 48%. Of those students whom had taken the education law course and were student teaching (n=217), only 16.5% responded. Conclusions This study began the foundational work to enlighten our profession with regard to the perceptions of pre-service teachers’ knowledge of school law. When looking at the results, the majority of questions were answered correctly by students enrolled in the educational law course on areas covering student/teacher rights, religion, child abuse, copyright law, and special services. Areas where both groups scored high were student rights, child abuse reporting, electronic media, special services, teacher rights. Areas where both scored low included teacher contracts, freedom of speech, parent rights, extra-curricular drug testing, and curriculum. All pre-service teachers reported the education law class as beneficial to becoming a teacher.