Title

Academic help-seeking at CWU

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom A

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

An important skill for overcoming academic challenges is seeking help when confronted with difficulty. In addition, previous research has identified gender differences in the tendency to seek professional help for personal problems (Addis & Mahalik, 2003). In this study we investigated various potential influences on academic help-seeking behaviors among students at CWU. Participants were 567 students, 184 men and 376 women, recruited from the psychology department research participation pool. Participants completed the 30-item short form Bem Sex-Role Inventory, the Academic Help-Seeking Behaviors Inventory, as well as a demographic questionnaire which included questions concerning year in college, ethnicity, gender, academic information, and whether students transferred from another university. The Academic Help-Seeking Behaviors Inventory is an original eight-item rating scale that was created for this study by the researchers. Although there were few differences between various student groups in help-seeking behavior, there was a significant effect for sex-role as measured by the Bem Inventory. Those who identified with the androgynous sex-role type were more likely to seek academic help than either feminine or masculine sex-role types. In contrast, no significance was obtained between help-seeking behavior and gender.

Poster Number

21

Faculty Mentor(s)

Heath Marrs

Additional Mentoring Department

Psychology

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May 17th, 2:00 PM May 17th, 4:30 PM

Academic help-seeking at CWU

SURC Ballroom A

An important skill for overcoming academic challenges is seeking help when confronted with difficulty. In addition, previous research has identified gender differences in the tendency to seek professional help for personal problems (Addis & Mahalik, 2003). In this study we investigated various potential influences on academic help-seeking behaviors among students at CWU. Participants were 567 students, 184 men and 376 women, recruited from the psychology department research participation pool. Participants completed the 30-item short form Bem Sex-Role Inventory, the Academic Help-Seeking Behaviors Inventory, as well as a demographic questionnaire which included questions concerning year in college, ethnicity, gender, academic information, and whether students transferred from another university. The Academic Help-Seeking Behaviors Inventory is an original eight-item rating scale that was created for this study by the researchers. Although there were few differences between various student groups in help-seeking behavior, there was a significant effect for sex-role as measured by the Bem Inventory. Those who identified with the androgynous sex-role type were more likely to seek academic help than either feminine or masculine sex-role types. In contrast, no significance was obtained between help-seeking behavior and gender.