Title

23 Years of decreased sulfate and nitrate concentrations in wet precipitation at Paradise, Mt. Rainier National Park

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom A

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

Since 1988, weekly wet precipitation samples from Paradise in Mt. Rainier National Park, WA, have been analyzed for major anions and cations, conductivity and pH. Volume weighted 3-month averages were tested for significant trends throughout the 23-year monitoring period and compared with analogous data collected at established National Atmospheric Deposition Program sites throughout the state. Over the last 23 years, (i) sulfate concentrations decreased by 51%, (ii) nitrate concentrations decreased by 55%, (iii) proton concentrations decreased by 59%, and (iv) pH increased from 5.1 to 5.5 (P=0.001). These results indicate that air pollution standards contribute significantly to the decrease in acid rain deposition to this pristine and vulnerable high elevation location, and that no apparent trans-Pacific transport of pollution is detected from Asia.

Poster Number

27

Faculty Mentor(s)

Anne Johansen

Additional Mentoring Department

Chemistry

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May 17th, 8:30 AM May 17th, 11:00 AM

23 Years of decreased sulfate and nitrate concentrations in wet precipitation at Paradise, Mt. Rainier National Park

SURC Ballroom A

Since 1988, weekly wet precipitation samples from Paradise in Mt. Rainier National Park, WA, have been analyzed for major anions and cations, conductivity and pH. Volume weighted 3-month averages were tested for significant trends throughout the 23-year monitoring period and compared with analogous data collected at established National Atmospheric Deposition Program sites throughout the state. Over the last 23 years, (i) sulfate concentrations decreased by 51%, (ii) nitrate concentrations decreased by 55%, (iii) proton concentrations decreased by 59%, and (iv) pH increased from 5.1 to 5.5 (P=0.001). These results indicate that air pollution standards contribute significantly to the decrease in acid rain deposition to this pristine and vulnerable high elevation location, and that no apparent trans-Pacific transport of pollution is detected from Asia.