Title

Regulation of Host Immune System by the Hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum

Presenter Information

Nicholas Diliani

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom A

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

Approximately one billion people in the world are currently infected with hookworm. Despite this high prevalence, little research has been done on host immunosuppression by hookworm. Our study focuses on characterizing the mechanisms by which hookworm suppresses the host immune response. We hypothesize that hookworm secretes proteins to shift the immune system away from a Th2 response, a normal response responsible for clearing the infection, to a mixed Th1/Th2 response. This mixed response results in cytokines from each of these two immune responses being released, thereby suppressing a full Th2 immune response. Hamsters, Mesocricetus auratus, will be infected with 150 stage three larvae by oral gavage and given time to allow the larvae to develop into adult worms. The worms will then be collected from the euthanized hamsters and incubated at 37°C in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) to allow for excretory/secretory protein collection. These proteins will be inoculated subcutaneously into mice, Mus musculus, and given time to allow the immune system to recognize the proteins. Proteins will either be inoculated alone, with ovalbumin, or mice will be inoculated with PBS alone. Mice will then be boosted later on with the same priming innoculum. Characterization of the host immune response will be done using a proliferation assay, a flow cytometry assay, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and a delayed-type hypersensitivity measurement.

Poster Number

13

Faculty Mentor(s)

Blaise Dondji

Additional Mentoring Department

Biological Sciences

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May 17th, 8:30 AM May 17th, 11:00 AM

Regulation of Host Immune System by the Hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum

SURC Ballroom A

Approximately one billion people in the world are currently infected with hookworm. Despite this high prevalence, little research has been done on host immunosuppression by hookworm. Our study focuses on characterizing the mechanisms by which hookworm suppresses the host immune response. We hypothesize that hookworm secretes proteins to shift the immune system away from a Th2 response, a normal response responsible for clearing the infection, to a mixed Th1/Th2 response. This mixed response results in cytokines from each of these two immune responses being released, thereby suppressing a full Th2 immune response. Hamsters, Mesocricetus auratus, will be infected with 150 stage three larvae by oral gavage and given time to allow the larvae to develop into adult worms. The worms will then be collected from the euthanized hamsters and incubated at 37°C in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) to allow for excretory/secretory protein collection. These proteins will be inoculated subcutaneously into mice, Mus musculus, and given time to allow the immune system to recognize the proteins. Proteins will either be inoculated alone, with ovalbumin, or mice will be inoculated with PBS alone. Mice will then be boosted later on with the same priming innoculum. Characterization of the host immune response will be done using a proliferation assay, a flow cytometry assay, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and a delayed-type hypersensitivity measurement.