Title

Differences between Traditional and Electronic Bullying amongst College Students

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom A

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

Abstract Differences between Traditional and Electronic Bullying amongst College Students by Leeland Dale Durst Fall 2011 This study examines the prevalence and impact of electronic and traditional bullying among college students. In this study eighty three men and women were surveyed in several sections of a large, lower-division psychology course at Central Washington University in the Pacific Northwest. The current study examines whether there are differences between electronic and traditional bullying among college students. Likert scale format and dichotomous questions are used to assess the students’ experiences of traditional and electronic bullying. In addition, open- ended questions in the survey addressed why students electronically bully. Results reveal high, statistically significant differences in occurrence for each context of bullying which are traditional, text-message, Internet and picture-phone. Significant differences were also found for each type of bullying consisting of five conditions which are physical, verbal, rumor, exclusion and secret exclusion. These findings may help in the establishment of treatments for psychological distress that may occur as a result of electronic intimidation and harassment. Implications for future research are discussed.

Poster Number

28

Faculty Mentor(s)

Stephanie Stein

Additional Mentoring Department

Psychology

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 17th, 2:00 PM May 17th, 4:30 PM

Differences between Traditional and Electronic Bullying amongst College Students

SURC Ballroom A

Abstract Differences between Traditional and Electronic Bullying amongst College Students by Leeland Dale Durst Fall 2011 This study examines the prevalence and impact of electronic and traditional bullying among college students. In this study eighty three men and women were surveyed in several sections of a large, lower-division psychology course at Central Washington University in the Pacific Northwest. The current study examines whether there are differences between electronic and traditional bullying among college students. Likert scale format and dichotomous questions are used to assess the students’ experiences of traditional and electronic bullying. In addition, open- ended questions in the survey addressed why students electronically bully. Results reveal high, statistically significant differences in occurrence for each context of bullying which are traditional, text-message, Internet and picture-phone. Significant differences were also found for each type of bullying consisting of five conditions which are physical, verbal, rumor, exclusion and secret exclusion. These findings may help in the establishment of treatments for psychological distress that may occur as a result of electronic intimidation and harassment. Implications for future research are discussed.