Title

Assessment of Groundwater Contamination and Associated Remediation Efforts, Hanford, Washington

Presenter Information

Serafina Ferri

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom A

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

Hanford Nuclear Reservation is a decommissioned facility that processed and refined radionuclides including Plutonium, Strontium, and Uranium for military purposes. Located along the western bank of the Columbia River in southeastern Washington, Hanford produced and stored these, and other caustic materials associated with nuclear armaments production for 45 years. In 1987, plutonium production ceased and the U.S. Department of Energy, in collaboration with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Washington Department of Ecology embarked on the largest environmental clean-up in U.S. history, requiring 11,000 employees. As this project has evolved, numerous studies have attempted to mode land measure the migration of radionuclides from Hanford facilities. One of the major environmental implications of this diffusion of radioactive materials is their negative effects on groundwater stores. This project will assess the diffusion of these materials, and provide a qualitative assessment of the ongoing clean-up initiatives.

Poster Number

9

Faculty Mentor(s)

Mike Pease

Additional Mentoring Department

Geography

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May 17th, 2:00 PM May 17th, 4:30 PM

Assessment of Groundwater Contamination and Associated Remediation Efforts, Hanford, Washington

SURC Ballroom A

Hanford Nuclear Reservation is a decommissioned facility that processed and refined radionuclides including Plutonium, Strontium, and Uranium for military purposes. Located along the western bank of the Columbia River in southeastern Washington, Hanford produced and stored these, and other caustic materials associated with nuclear armaments production for 45 years. In 1987, plutonium production ceased and the U.S. Department of Energy, in collaboration with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Washington Department of Ecology embarked on the largest environmental clean-up in U.S. history, requiring 11,000 employees. As this project has evolved, numerous studies have attempted to mode land measure the migration of radionuclides from Hanford facilities. One of the major environmental implications of this diffusion of radioactive materials is their negative effects on groundwater stores. This project will assess the diffusion of these materials, and provide a qualitative assessment of the ongoing clean-up initiatives.