Title

A Comparative Study of Yakama Nation and Selah, Washington Residents’ Sense of Place

Presenter Information

Kelsey Johnson

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom A

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

Flowing from the Cascade Mountains to the Columbia River, the Yakima River is a source of significant meaning for many eastern Washington communities. The river travels approximately 215 miles through private, state, federal and tribal lands. Previous modifications, such as dams and diversions for irrigation and flood control, have had significant impacts on not only the physical features of the river, but to the communities connected to the river. Research suggests that changes such as these can have a profound impact on peoples’ perceptions of those landscapes. These perceptions, also known as sense of place, often determine how resources are used and managed. Often these perceptions are subjective to the individuals and cultures connected to the landscape. This research evaluates key stakeholders’ sense of place of the Yakima River in order to gain a snapshot of current perspectives that will aid in tailoring future resource management policies. In using a survey approach to interview key stakeholders, this research will evaluate the connections between people and the Yakima River. Specifically, this research will compare Yakama Nation tribal members’ sense of place with Selah community members’ sense of place.

Poster Number

29

Faculty Mentor(s)

Kathleen Barlow

Additional Mentoring Department

Anthropology

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May 17th, 11:15 AM May 17th, 1:44 PM

A Comparative Study of Yakama Nation and Selah, Washington Residents’ Sense of Place

SURC Ballroom A

Flowing from the Cascade Mountains to the Columbia River, the Yakima River is a source of significant meaning for many eastern Washington communities. The river travels approximately 215 miles through private, state, federal and tribal lands. Previous modifications, such as dams and diversions for irrigation and flood control, have had significant impacts on not only the physical features of the river, but to the communities connected to the river. Research suggests that changes such as these can have a profound impact on peoples’ perceptions of those landscapes. These perceptions, also known as sense of place, often determine how resources are used and managed. Often these perceptions are subjective to the individuals and cultures connected to the landscape. This research evaluates key stakeholders’ sense of place of the Yakima River in order to gain a snapshot of current perspectives that will aid in tailoring future resource management policies. In using a survey approach to interview key stakeholders, this research will evaluate the connections between people and the Yakima River. Specifically, this research will compare Yakama Nation tribal members’ sense of place with Selah community members’ sense of place.