Title

PERECEPTUAL RESPONSES DURING A 5K RUNNING PERFORMANCE FOLLOWING EXERCISE INDUCED MUSCLE SORENESS

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom A

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

Caffeine functions as an adenosine receptor antagonist by blocking pain reception. However, research is warranted to examine the efficacy of caffeine on delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS). PURPOSE: This study investigated the effects of caffeine on 5km time trial performance following exercise-induced muscle soreness. METHODS: Recreationally trained male participants (n=9) completed a 30min downhill run at 70% VO2max to induce muscle soreness. Participants returned to the lab 48 h after the downhill run to complete a 5k-time trial (TT). Using a double blind, counterbalanced design the participants ingested either the placebo (5mg/kg) (PLB) or caffeine (5mg/kg) (CAFF) 1h prior to the 5km TT. RPE was recorded every 2 min during each minute of the TT. A repeated measures ANOVA (treatment x time) was used to analyze dependent measures. RESULTS: There was no interaction for the treatments (PLB, CAFF) across time for RPE or heart rate. No significant difference was detected for 5k performances between trials (1036.2 ± 92.6 sec vs. 1043 ± 91.9 sec for CAFF and PLB, respectively). There was no difference between CAFF and PLB trials for RF muscle soreness (p = .216) or VMO muscle soreness (p = .679). These findings of similar physiological and pain responses between trials suggest that caffeine has a limited ergogenic effect after severe muscle damage on subsequent sustained maximal exercise performance.

Poster Number

10

Faculty Mentor(s)

Robert Pritchett, Kelly Pritchett

Additional Mentoring Department

Nutrition, Exercise, and Health Science

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May 17th, 11:15 AM May 17th, 1:44 PM

PERECEPTUAL RESPONSES DURING A 5K RUNNING PERFORMANCE FOLLOWING EXERCISE INDUCED MUSCLE SORENESS

SURC Ballroom A

Caffeine functions as an adenosine receptor antagonist by blocking pain reception. However, research is warranted to examine the efficacy of caffeine on delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS). PURPOSE: This study investigated the effects of caffeine on 5km time trial performance following exercise-induced muscle soreness. METHODS: Recreationally trained male participants (n=9) completed a 30min downhill run at 70% VO2max to induce muscle soreness. Participants returned to the lab 48 h after the downhill run to complete a 5k-time trial (TT). Using a double blind, counterbalanced design the participants ingested either the placebo (5mg/kg) (PLB) or caffeine (5mg/kg) (CAFF) 1h prior to the 5km TT. RPE was recorded every 2 min during each minute of the TT. A repeated measures ANOVA (treatment x time) was used to analyze dependent measures. RESULTS: There was no interaction for the treatments (PLB, CAFF) across time for RPE or heart rate. No significant difference was detected for 5k performances between trials (1036.2 ± 92.6 sec vs. 1043 ± 91.9 sec for CAFF and PLB, respectively). There was no difference between CAFF and PLB trials for RF muscle soreness (p = .216) or VMO muscle soreness (p = .679). These findings of similar physiological and pain responses between trials suggest that caffeine has a limited ergogenic effect after severe muscle damage on subsequent sustained maximal exercise performance.