Title

The Relationship Between Homeschooling and Child Abuse

Presenter Information

Rebecca Webster

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 201

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

Due to the lack of records and regulation on homeschooling, it is difficult to determine if homeschooling poses any more risk for child maltreatment than a child attending regular school and if there is a relationship between homeschooling and child abuse. Here, I look at the risk factors and the reasons why people homeschool their children and compare those to the risk factors involved with child abuse. Also I look into the criticisms of homeschooling and the stigmas attached to it. Among the greatest criticisms leveled are isolation and the deficits of regulating homeschooled children. Despite the risk factors, the interviews imply that child abuse and homeschooling are not similar enough to suggest a pattern. It is clear that homeschooling provides an opportunity to conceal child abuse, but it is not clear that abuse is more prevalent than what occurs to children who attend public schools. Due to the lack of information and records concerning homeschooled children, more investigation is needed to determine if there is a relationship between homeschooling and child abuse. Through interviewing social workers, I examined the relationship between homeschooling and child abuse and found no evidence of their relationship, but there was strong evidence to suggest that parents engaging in maltreatment and educational neglect are more likely to use homeschooling as a guise.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Michael Harrod

Additional Mentoring Department

Sociology

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May 16th, 12:40 PM May 16th, 1:00 PM

The Relationship Between Homeschooling and Child Abuse

SURC 201

Due to the lack of records and regulation on homeschooling, it is difficult to determine if homeschooling poses any more risk for child maltreatment than a child attending regular school and if there is a relationship between homeschooling and child abuse. Here, I look at the risk factors and the reasons why people homeschool their children and compare those to the risk factors involved with child abuse. Also I look into the criticisms of homeschooling and the stigmas attached to it. Among the greatest criticisms leveled are isolation and the deficits of regulating homeschooled children. Despite the risk factors, the interviews imply that child abuse and homeschooling are not similar enough to suggest a pattern. It is clear that homeschooling provides an opportunity to conceal child abuse, but it is not clear that abuse is more prevalent than what occurs to children who attend public schools. Due to the lack of information and records concerning homeschooled children, more investigation is needed to determine if there is a relationship between homeschooling and child abuse. Through interviewing social workers, I examined the relationship between homeschooling and child abuse and found no evidence of their relationship, but there was strong evidence to suggest that parents engaging in maltreatment and educational neglect are more likely to use homeschooling as a guise.