Title

Miller v. Alabama: Juveniles and Eighth Amendment

Presenter Information

Edward Welch

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 137A

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

The recent case of Miller v. Alabama continues the trend of the US Supreme Court looking at juveniles differently than adults regarding sentences and the Eighth Amendment. In the Miller case, Evan Miller was 14 years old when sentenced to life in prison without possibility of parole. The majority of the US Supreme Court found that the mandatory sentencing of life without parole for juveniles was in direct violation of the Eighth Amendment because the sentence was disproportionate for the crime. Since the ruling courts now have to distinguish if the proportionality of the crime fits a sentence of life without parole without giving too much leniency to the juvenile for their crime. This presentation will discuss the facts of the case and the implications for juvenile sentences which have come into conflict with their rights protected under the Eighth Amendment. Also discussed in this presentation will be the trends of the US Supreme Court when deciding penalties for juveniles charged as an adult and their decision in the Roper and Graham cases.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Mary Ellen Reimund

Additional Mentoring Department

Law and Justice

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May 16th, 9:30 AM May 16th, 10:50 AM

Miller v. Alabama: Juveniles and Eighth Amendment

SURC 137A

The recent case of Miller v. Alabama continues the trend of the US Supreme Court looking at juveniles differently than adults regarding sentences and the Eighth Amendment. In the Miller case, Evan Miller was 14 years old when sentenced to life in prison without possibility of parole. The majority of the US Supreme Court found that the mandatory sentencing of life without parole for juveniles was in direct violation of the Eighth Amendment because the sentence was disproportionate for the crime. Since the ruling courts now have to distinguish if the proportionality of the crime fits a sentence of life without parole without giving too much leniency to the juvenile for their crime. This presentation will discuss the facts of the case and the implications for juvenile sentences which have come into conflict with their rights protected under the Eighth Amendment. Also discussed in this presentation will be the trends of the US Supreme Court when deciding penalties for juveniles charged as an adult and their decision in the Roper and Graham cases.