Title

Jardines v. Florida

Presenter Information

Caless Davis

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 137A

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

Jardines v. Florida deals with the issue of using dogs in the collection of evidence and whether it constitutes a search. This argument is whether a dog’s detection ability presents an unreasonable search that violates individual rights protected by the Fourth Amendment. Dogs have been used in the area of law enforcement; legal precedents of past cases such as Illinois v. Caballes, United States v. Place, City of Indianapolis v. Edmund have established that dog sniffs are not searches under the Fourth Amendment. Jardines v. Florida is the first case of its kind to deal with canine detection at a residence. The two conflicting issues at stake are privacy rights verses dog sniffs able to occur at a place of residence without a need for a warrant or probable cause. My presentation will show how the lower courts presided over Jardines v. Florida, and how the Supreme Court ruling will affect the public. I will also discuss how the Supreme Court has dealt with dog sniffs in the past and how those decisions may have shaped the ruling in Jardines v. Florida.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Teresa Francis

Additional Mentoring Department

Law and Justice

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May 16th, 9:30 AM May 16th, 10:50 AM

Jardines v. Florida

SURC 137A

Jardines v. Florida deals with the issue of using dogs in the collection of evidence and whether it constitutes a search. This argument is whether a dog’s detection ability presents an unreasonable search that violates individual rights protected by the Fourth Amendment. Dogs have been used in the area of law enforcement; legal precedents of past cases such as Illinois v. Caballes, United States v. Place, City of Indianapolis v. Edmund have established that dog sniffs are not searches under the Fourth Amendment. Jardines v. Florida is the first case of its kind to deal with canine detection at a residence. The two conflicting issues at stake are privacy rights verses dog sniffs able to occur at a place of residence without a need for a warrant or probable cause. My presentation will show how the lower courts presided over Jardines v. Florida, and how the Supreme Court ruling will affect the public. I will also discuss how the Supreme Court has dealt with dog sniffs in the past and how those decisions may have shaped the ruling in Jardines v. Florida.