Title

Castle City, Carcassonne, the Education of its Youth

Presenter Information

Susan Donahoe

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 301

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

Descriptive Study: How are children in France taught literacy skills? What kinds of schools are there? What curriculum? What processes are used in the elementary years? Does the presence of an enormous historical and cultural site within the city have an affect on the education of the elementary aged students? A small French town, Carcassonne, in the foothills of wine countryside is in many ways similar to Ellensburg. Most parents work; children go to school. Most children attend the regular state-supported schools for reading, writing, and so forth. There is one astounding difference: a huge, looming, double-walled stone fortress. This overpowering restored medieval castle dominates the town. Castles and other prominent architectural forms effect developing children. Last summer in Carcassonne, I visited three schools, saw children and materials, and talked with educators. Photographs document the visit and show processes of teaching the history of the edifice, its era, and the historical and cultural significance to people of the area. The walled city contains a school with educators and materials to teach significant facts to rotating groups of students of the region. I created a questionnaire for comparing and contrasting other nations' educational systems for an upcoming sabbatical study on international educational systems across nations that I can contact and visit. Idiosyncratic phenomenon emerged beyond it which are described and documented here. This presentation is a descriptive study of education in Carcassonne, France.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Susan Donahoe

Additional Mentoring Department

Education

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May 16th, 1:30 PM May 16th, 1:50 PM

Castle City, Carcassonne, the Education of its Youth

SURC 301

Descriptive Study: How are children in France taught literacy skills? What kinds of schools are there? What curriculum? What processes are used in the elementary years? Does the presence of an enormous historical and cultural site within the city have an affect on the education of the elementary aged students? A small French town, Carcassonne, in the foothills of wine countryside is in many ways similar to Ellensburg. Most parents work; children go to school. Most children attend the regular state-supported schools for reading, writing, and so forth. There is one astounding difference: a huge, looming, double-walled stone fortress. This overpowering restored medieval castle dominates the town. Castles and other prominent architectural forms effect developing children. Last summer in Carcassonne, I visited three schools, saw children and materials, and talked with educators. Photographs document the visit and show processes of teaching the history of the edifice, its era, and the historical and cultural significance to people of the area. The walled city contains a school with educators and materials to teach significant facts to rotating groups of students of the region. I created a questionnaire for comparing and contrasting other nations' educational systems for an upcoming sabbatical study on international educational systems across nations that I can contact and visit. Idiosyncratic phenomenon emerged beyond it which are described and documented here. This presentation is a descriptive study of education in Carcassonne, France.