Title

Mindfulness as an Attenuating Factor in the Relationship between Sexual Orientation and Levels of Stress, Depression, and Self-Esteem

Presenter Information

Emily Faust

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 201

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

Individuals who identify as gay, lesbian, or bisexual suffer from higher rates of factors that negatively impact psychological health and well-being (Berlan, Corliss, Field, Goodman, and Austin, 2010; Cochran, Sullivan, and Mays, 2003). Mindfulness, a construct characterized by non-judgmental awareness, has been shown to relate to lower levels of several negative emotional factors, including stress, depression, and anxiety (Brown, Ryan, and Creswell, 2007). The current study, a replication of a study previously conducted by this author (Faust, 2012), examines levels of stress, depression, self-esteem, and dispositional mindfulness among students at Central Washington University (N = 100, anticipated). It is hypothesized that individuals who self-identify as members of a sexual minority category will have higher levels of stress and depression, and lower levels of self-esteem, than individuals who identify as exclusively heterosexual. It is also hypothesized that mindfulness will attenuate the relationship between sexual minority status and negative psychological factors. Specifically, it is hypothesized that for sexual minority individuals, those with higher levels of mindfulness will have lower levels of depression and stress and higher levels of self-esteem than those with lower levels of mindfulness. The implications for using mindfulness-based interventions in schools, community centers, and clinical settings with individuals who are struggling with sexual orientation difficulties will be discussed. Data collection in process.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Robyn Brammer

Additional Mentoring Department

Other

Additional Mentoring Department

Mental Health Counseling

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May 16th, 1:10 PM May 16th, 1:30 PM

Mindfulness as an Attenuating Factor in the Relationship between Sexual Orientation and Levels of Stress, Depression, and Self-Esteem

SURC 201

Individuals who identify as gay, lesbian, or bisexual suffer from higher rates of factors that negatively impact psychological health and well-being (Berlan, Corliss, Field, Goodman, and Austin, 2010; Cochran, Sullivan, and Mays, 2003). Mindfulness, a construct characterized by non-judgmental awareness, has been shown to relate to lower levels of several negative emotional factors, including stress, depression, and anxiety (Brown, Ryan, and Creswell, 2007). The current study, a replication of a study previously conducted by this author (Faust, 2012), examines levels of stress, depression, self-esteem, and dispositional mindfulness among students at Central Washington University (N = 100, anticipated). It is hypothesized that individuals who self-identify as members of a sexual minority category will have higher levels of stress and depression, and lower levels of self-esteem, than individuals who identify as exclusively heterosexual. It is also hypothesized that mindfulness will attenuate the relationship between sexual minority status and negative psychological factors. Specifically, it is hypothesized that for sexual minority individuals, those with higher levels of mindfulness will have lower levels of depression and stress and higher levels of self-esteem than those with lower levels of mindfulness. The implications for using mindfulness-based interventions in schools, community centers, and clinical settings with individuals who are struggling with sexual orientation difficulties will be discussed. Data collection in process.