Title

How America's Drug War affects Mexico's Tourism

Presenter Information

Carley James

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 271

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

In 2006, Felipe Calderon was elected into office as Mexico’s president after running on an anti-drug, anti-cartel platform. Since 2006, the violence in Mexico has increased dramatically, which has negatively affected Mexico's number one industry: tourism. Ports are being taken off-route on cruise lines, and Mazatlan's tourism market has fallen by 79 percent. There are many states in Mexico which the United States Travel Bureau suggests that American citizens stay out of as safety precautions. Mexico is one of the countries with the strongest gun control laws, and it can take a year or more in order for a citizen to legally own a gun. Where are these drug cartels getting their guns from? It is the same place that the illegal drugs are going–America. America's lax laws on international gun trafficking is making it easy for drug cartel to get high quality, military-style guns. These guns are being used to protect the illegal drugs over the border and into America to be sold for profit. There is little that can be done to stop the trafficking of drugs and guns by the cartel, while increasing the tourism market to what it once was in Mexico. Aeromexico and other airlines are offering deals in order to help increase Mexico's travel market. My purpose of researching this issue is to draw attention to Mexico's tourism decrease, as well as make clear in which areas the violence is focused in.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dorothy Chase

Additional Mentoring Department

Recreation and Tourism

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May 16th, 2:40 PM May 16th, 3:00 PM

How America's Drug War affects Mexico's Tourism

SURC 271

In 2006, Felipe Calderon was elected into office as Mexico’s president after running on an anti-drug, anti-cartel platform. Since 2006, the violence in Mexico has increased dramatically, which has negatively affected Mexico's number one industry: tourism. Ports are being taken off-route on cruise lines, and Mazatlan's tourism market has fallen by 79 percent. There are many states in Mexico which the United States Travel Bureau suggests that American citizens stay out of as safety precautions. Mexico is one of the countries with the strongest gun control laws, and it can take a year or more in order for a citizen to legally own a gun. Where are these drug cartels getting their guns from? It is the same place that the illegal drugs are going–America. America's lax laws on international gun trafficking is making it easy for drug cartel to get high quality, military-style guns. These guns are being used to protect the illegal drugs over the border and into America to be sold for profit. There is little that can be done to stop the trafficking of drugs and guns by the cartel, while increasing the tourism market to what it once was in Mexico. Aeromexico and other airlines are offering deals in order to help increase Mexico's travel market. My purpose of researching this issue is to draw attention to Mexico's tourism decrease, as well as make clear in which areas the violence is focused in.