Title

Pollution Control in the Puyallup Floodplain: The Problem of Urban Sprawl

Presenter Information

Spencer Kajca

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 137A

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

The Puyallup River is fed by glacier melt on Mt. Rainer. It runs across forty-five miles of western Washington, before emptying into the Puget Sound. The river valley is a popular attraction for homeowners. There are currently 150,000 people residing in the river valley. Improper management of urban growth is damaging the rivers floodplain and reducing water quality. The consequences of floodplain modifications are intensified during rainy seasons. Homes are being inundated by storm water, carrying household chemicals and large debris into the river. As this continues to happen oxygen levels are reduced, creating a hypoxic environment. In hypoxic waters, fish and water organisms numbers will decline. My research explores the current Puyallup River floodplain policies, specifically, where policy has failed to protect habitat and how it can be improved.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Rex Wirth

Additional Mentoring Department

Political Science

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May 16th, 1:30 PM May 16th, 1:50 PM

Pollution Control in the Puyallup Floodplain: The Problem of Urban Sprawl

SURC 137A

The Puyallup River is fed by glacier melt on Mt. Rainer. It runs across forty-five miles of western Washington, before emptying into the Puget Sound. The river valley is a popular attraction for homeowners. There are currently 150,000 people residing in the river valley. Improper management of urban growth is damaging the rivers floodplain and reducing water quality. The consequences of floodplain modifications are intensified during rainy seasons. Homes are being inundated by storm water, carrying household chemicals and large debris into the river. As this continues to happen oxygen levels are reduced, creating a hypoxic environment. In hypoxic waters, fish and water organisms numbers will decline. My research explores the current Puyallup River floodplain policies, specifically, where policy has failed to protect habitat and how it can be improved.