Title

Utilizing summer programs to promote wellness knowledge through physical education and health classes in Micronesia

Presenter Information

Kevin McFadden
Evan Johnson
Joe Avila

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 271

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

Increasing the knowledge of children and adolescents is imperative to empower youth to make healthy lifestyle choices (Aermican Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, 1999). This is particularly true in the Micronesian islands where obesity, low fitness levels, tobacco use, poor nutrition choices, and bullying and suicide rates are often higher than United States’ counterparts (Youth Risk Behavior Survelliance System, 2007; 2009). This study explored the impact of a wellness-based summer program planned and implemented by college-level education students. Specifically, is this type of program successful in increasing knowledge in the areas of fitness, nutrition, tobacco, bullying, and suicide prevention? Eighty three students ages 7-15 were given a 25-question, multiple choice test prior to and after attending a two-week session for five hours per day. Data were analyzed using dependent t-tests in SPSS to determine whether mean scores were statistically different from pre-test to post-test in the five subscales. Results indicated there were positive differences in knowledge related to the tobacco and fitness but not in the other sub-scales. Item design, teacher experience level, and prior participant knowledge may have contributed to mixed findings.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Stefan Ward, Mark Perez

Additional Mentoring Department

Physical Education, School and Public Health

Additional Mentoring Department

Physical Education, School and Public Health

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May 16th, 4:50 PM May 16th, 5:10 PM

Utilizing summer programs to promote wellness knowledge through physical education and health classes in Micronesia

SURC 271

Increasing the knowledge of children and adolescents is imperative to empower youth to make healthy lifestyle choices (Aermican Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, 1999). This is particularly true in the Micronesian islands where obesity, low fitness levels, tobacco use, poor nutrition choices, and bullying and suicide rates are often higher than United States’ counterparts (Youth Risk Behavior Survelliance System, 2007; 2009). This study explored the impact of a wellness-based summer program planned and implemented by college-level education students. Specifically, is this type of program successful in increasing knowledge in the areas of fitness, nutrition, tobacco, bullying, and suicide prevention? Eighty three students ages 7-15 were given a 25-question, multiple choice test prior to and after attending a two-week session for five hours per day. Data were analyzed using dependent t-tests in SPSS to determine whether mean scores were statistically different from pre-test to post-test in the five subscales. Results indicated there were positive differences in knowledge related to the tobacco and fitness but not in the other sub-scales. Item design, teacher experience level, and prior participant knowledge may have contributed to mixed findings.