Title

New far-infrared laser emissions from optically pumped formic acid and several of its isotopic forms

Presenter Information

Kerry Olivier
Brad DeShano
Breanna Cain

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 140

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

LASER is an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Following its invention, the laser was often dismissed as the solution in search of a problem. Ironically though, lasers are now commonplace in our modern lives including their use in a variety of medical, defense, service, entertainment, and of course science applications. One can clearly see that lasers have proven to be the solution in search of a problem. The laser lab at Central Washington University has been working to fill the gaps that currently exist in the far-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum, specifically focusing on wavelengths ranging from about 200 to 1,100 microns. A recently constructed optically pumped molecular laser system was used for this investigation. This system consists of a carbon dioxide laser that provided the infrared energy necessary to power the far-infrared laser. The medium for the far-infrared laser was either formic acid (HCOOH) or one of its isotopic forms. With this system, 10 new far-infrared laser emissions have been detected, ranging in wavelength from 219.0 to 954.9 microns. Additionally, this optically pumped laser system was capable of generating 95 known far-infrared laser emissions from these molecules with wavelengths up to 1030.378 micron. This presentation will discuss the experimental setup and methods utilized in the search for new far-infrared laser emissions.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Mike Jackson

Additional Mentoring Department

Physics

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 16th, 11:40 AM May 16th, 12:00 PM

New far-infrared laser emissions from optically pumped formic acid and several of its isotopic forms

SURC 140

LASER is an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Following its invention, the laser was often dismissed as the solution in search of a problem. Ironically though, lasers are now commonplace in our modern lives including their use in a variety of medical, defense, service, entertainment, and of course science applications. One can clearly see that lasers have proven to be the solution in search of a problem. The laser lab at Central Washington University has been working to fill the gaps that currently exist in the far-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum, specifically focusing on wavelengths ranging from about 200 to 1,100 microns. A recently constructed optically pumped molecular laser system was used for this investigation. This system consists of a carbon dioxide laser that provided the infrared energy necessary to power the far-infrared laser. The medium for the far-infrared laser was either formic acid (HCOOH) or one of its isotopic forms. With this system, 10 new far-infrared laser emissions have been detected, ranging in wavelength from 219.0 to 954.9 microns. Additionally, this optically pumped laser system was capable of generating 95 known far-infrared laser emissions from these molecules with wavelengths up to 1030.378 micron. This presentation will discuss the experimental setup and methods utilized in the search for new far-infrared laser emissions.