Title

Gender Norms: The Negative Impact of Pop Culture on the Advancement of Gender Roles

Presenter Information

Nancy Pizano

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 135

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

The image of women in popular media has progressed through time, but the negative light in which female roles are cast can still be easily found. Casino Royale, from the Bond franchise, is a 2006 film and the gender roles expressed in the movie are not drastically different than those John Stuart Mill argued against in 1869 Britain. While the Bond series has had instances of embracing the feminist movement, female roles remain largely viewed as subordinate to men. Empirical data suggests that the portrayal of women’s inferiority to men in film will influence the way women are regarded in society through social cognitive theory. As a result, films such as Casino Royale hinder the influence of works such as Mill’s “Subjection of Women” because they help maintain gender norms instead of advancing a progressive, equal relationship between the sexes.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Melissa Johnson

Additional Mentoring Department

English

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Gender Norms: The Negative Impact of Pop Culture on the Advancement of Gender Roles

SURC 135

The image of women in popular media has progressed through time, but the negative light in which female roles are cast can still be easily found. Casino Royale, from the Bond franchise, is a 2006 film and the gender roles expressed in the movie are not drastically different than those John Stuart Mill argued against in 1869 Britain. While the Bond series has had instances of embracing the feminist movement, female roles remain largely viewed as subordinate to men. Empirical data suggests that the portrayal of women’s inferiority to men in film will influence the way women are regarded in society through social cognitive theory. As a result, films such as Casino Royale hinder the influence of works such as Mill’s “Subjection of Women” because they help maintain gender norms instead of advancing a progressive, equal relationship between the sexes.