Title

Reaction Times and Decision Making in Video Gamers versus Non-gamers

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

This study represents the first phase of a broader study investigating potential brain processing differences between video gamers and non-gamers. The purpose of the current study was to investigate reaction times to visual stimuli in individuals who regularly play action games versus individuals who do not. Stimuli used were based on the visual odd-ball paradigm in which participants had to respond to standard and rare occurring visual targets. Results indicate that the speed of decision making and reaction are increased for those who regularly play video games for correct decisions while not decreasing the level of accuracy in any way. Findings have implications for possible neural processing differences in individuals who regularly play action video games.

Poster Number

44

Faculty Mentor(s)

Ralf Greenwald

Additional Mentoring Department

Psychology

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May 16th, 2:15 PM May 16th, 4:44 PM

Reaction Times and Decision Making in Video Gamers versus Non-gamers

SURC Ballroom C/D

This study represents the first phase of a broader study investigating potential brain processing differences between video gamers and non-gamers. The purpose of the current study was to investigate reaction times to visual stimuli in individuals who regularly play action games versus individuals who do not. Stimuli used were based on the visual odd-ball paradigm in which participants had to respond to standard and rare occurring visual targets. Results indicate that the speed of decision making and reaction are increased for those who regularly play video games for correct decisions while not decreasing the level of accuracy in any way. Findings have implications for possible neural processing differences in individuals who regularly play action video games.