Title

Rendering and Articulation of a Bobcat

Presenter Information

Kyleen Sweepe

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

I obtained this juvenile bobcat, gutted and de-fleshed, from Moffat Taxidermy in Spokane, Washington. For rendering, I took the bobcat to Mike Kammenga for his Dermestid beetle colony to clean tissue from the bones, then a crock-pot for about six hours and lastly into 35percent hydrogen peroxide soak to whiten bones. After, I had a near-complete skeleton missing only two ribs and both clavicles. Articulation started with the shaping of the backbone wire and positioning small pieces of ivory felt between each vertebra to account for the missing epiphyses. I placed each vertebra into correct anatomical order and glued it into place on the wire; the completed backbone was then attached to two steel support rods, glued and wired for further immobility. Then, the pelvis was glued to the sacrum, which articulates to the last lumbar vertebra. The process for the hindlimbs included articulating and gluing the leg bones, tarsals, metatarsals and phalanges. I, then, repeated the process for the forelimbs, including the forelimb bones, carpals, metacarpals, and phalanges. The ribs were glued onto the thoracic vertebrae one by one, with the final step that of gluing the cranium to the first cervical vertebra.

Poster Number

1

Faculty Mentor(s)

Patrick Lubinski

Additional Mentoring Department

Anthropology

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May 16th, 8:20 AM May 16th, 10:50 AM

Rendering and Articulation of a Bobcat

SURC Ballroom C/D

I obtained this juvenile bobcat, gutted and de-fleshed, from Moffat Taxidermy in Spokane, Washington. For rendering, I took the bobcat to Mike Kammenga for his Dermestid beetle colony to clean tissue from the bones, then a crock-pot for about six hours and lastly into 35percent hydrogen peroxide soak to whiten bones. After, I had a near-complete skeleton missing only two ribs and both clavicles. Articulation started with the shaping of the backbone wire and positioning small pieces of ivory felt between each vertebra to account for the missing epiphyses. I placed each vertebra into correct anatomical order and glued it into place on the wire; the completed backbone was then attached to two steel support rods, glued and wired for further immobility. Then, the pelvis was glued to the sacrum, which articulates to the last lumbar vertebra. The process for the hindlimbs included articulating and gluing the leg bones, tarsals, metatarsals and phalanges. I, then, repeated the process for the forelimbs, including the forelimb bones, carpals, metacarpals, and phalanges. The ribs were glued onto the thoracic vertebrae one by one, with the final step that of gluing the cranium to the first cervical vertebra.