Title

Synthesis Towards Straight Chain Borinic Acids as Potential HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors

Presenter Information

Erik Contreras

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

There are 34 million people currently infected with HIV. The only treatment available involves merely slowing the development of HIV into AIDS. This is done with a cocktail of antiretroviral drugs. A drug of this type is a protease inhibitor. HIV-1 protease is an enzyme responsible for the release of mature HIV viral particles into the body. A cocktail of drugs is necessary because the virus will continually mutate and develop resistance to the antiretroviral drug. HIV-1 protease eventually becomes resistant to the inhibitors and new inhibitors are needed. The goal of this research is to develop a synthesis for a potential HIV-1 protease inhibitor which mimics the transition state analog of the natural substrate, and in turn interferes with the viral life cycle. These boronated compounds should provide better HIV treatment that has fewer side effects, increased affinity for the enzyme, and demonstrates greater affinity for the mutated forms of the enzyme as well.

Poster Number

46

Faculty Mentor(s)

Levente Fabry-Asztalos

Additional Mentoring Department

Chemistry

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Synthesis Towards Straight Chain Borinic Acids as Potential HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors

SURC Ballroom C/D

There are 34 million people currently infected with HIV. The only treatment available involves merely slowing the development of HIV into AIDS. This is done with a cocktail of antiretroviral drugs. A drug of this type is a protease inhibitor. HIV-1 protease is an enzyme responsible for the release of mature HIV viral particles into the body. A cocktail of drugs is necessary because the virus will continually mutate and develop resistance to the antiretroviral drug. HIV-1 protease eventually becomes resistant to the inhibitors and new inhibitors are needed. The goal of this research is to develop a synthesis for a potential HIV-1 protease inhibitor which mimics the transition state analog of the natural substrate, and in turn interferes with the viral life cycle. These boronated compounds should provide better HIV treatment that has fewer side effects, increased affinity for the enzyme, and demonstrates greater affinity for the mutated forms of the enzyme as well.