Title

Variability of Locomotion in Mantled Howling Monkeys (Alouatta palliata) in Costa Rica and Nicaragua

Presenter Information

Erika Price

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

I examined how differences in sex, age, and habitat affect locomotion in mantled howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata). I conducted field observations from June 1 through July 7, 2012 at La Suerte Biological Field Station in Costa Rica and Ometepe Biological Field Station in Nicaragua. I studied two groups of habituated monkeys of about 10 to 20 individuals each, approximately three-fourths adults, one-eighth juveniles, and one-eighth infants. I studied four aspects of locomotion: mode, forest level utilized, substrate type used, and tail use. Data were collected via focal and scan animal sampling, and were later converted into rates for each age group, sex, and field site. Climbing was found to be the most prevalent mode of locomotion among all individuals. Infants and juveniles jumped more than adults, and all adults were generally similar in their patterns of locomotion. No individuals descended to the ground, and descend to the understory occurred at only one site. At both sites, they preferred mid-canopy more than crown, and crown more than emergent trees. Generally, all individuals utilized small substrates the most, then medium, and then large. Oblique substrates were utilized the most, followed by horizontal and, then, vertical. At both locations, infants used their tails more during locomotion than did any other age group. Generally, substrate and forest level use were quite similar between age/sex groups and sites, but modes of locomotion and tail use exhibited more variation. Due to the limited amount of time spent in the field, these results may not represent how locomotion varies over a longer period of time.

Poster Number

15

Faculty Mentor(s)

Lori Sheeran

Additional Mentoring Department

Primate Behavior

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Variability of Locomotion in Mantled Howling Monkeys (Alouatta palliata) in Costa Rica and Nicaragua

SURC Ballroom C/D

I examined how differences in sex, age, and habitat affect locomotion in mantled howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata). I conducted field observations from June 1 through July 7, 2012 at La Suerte Biological Field Station in Costa Rica and Ometepe Biological Field Station in Nicaragua. I studied two groups of habituated monkeys of about 10 to 20 individuals each, approximately three-fourths adults, one-eighth juveniles, and one-eighth infants. I studied four aspects of locomotion: mode, forest level utilized, substrate type used, and tail use. Data were collected via focal and scan animal sampling, and were later converted into rates for each age group, sex, and field site. Climbing was found to be the most prevalent mode of locomotion among all individuals. Infants and juveniles jumped more than adults, and all adults were generally similar in their patterns of locomotion. No individuals descended to the ground, and descend to the understory occurred at only one site. At both sites, they preferred mid-canopy more than crown, and crown more than emergent trees. Generally, all individuals utilized small substrates the most, then medium, and then large. Oblique substrates were utilized the most, followed by horizontal and, then, vertical. At both locations, infants used their tails more during locomotion than did any other age group. Generally, substrate and forest level use were quite similar between age/sex groups and sites, but modes of locomotion and tail use exhibited more variation. Due to the limited amount of time spent in the field, these results may not represent how locomotion varies over a longer period of time.