Title

Are the Eyes (and the Face) Truly the Windows to the Soul?

Presenter Information

Donald Galatis

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

One method for investigating facial inferences and social perception has been to ask individuals to make personality assessments from the faces of unacquainted individuals (Kenny, Albright and Malloy, 1988; Riggio, Lippa and Salinas, 1990; Berry, 1990, 1991). Results generally indicated that individuals unacquainted with stimulus persons can make accurate personality assessments under certain conditions. The current study evaluated the capacities of individuals to make personality assessments of unacquainted individuals from facial expressions in photographs. The photographs were age-varied, pre-fame childhood pictures of individuals who later became famous as adults, either renown for positive behavior and societal contributions, or notorious for negative behavior and destructiveness. Six pre-fame photographs (two toddlers, two 10 year olds, two early teens), three of ‘positive’ individuals and three of ‘negative’ individuals, were selected from a pool of 24 pictures, based on lack of recognition in a pilot study. They were electronically and randomly presented sequentially to single participants in an online survey. Each participant responded to a series of questions about various personality characteristics of the stimulus person, while the photograph remained on screen, before being presented with the next photograph and question set. Results indicated that participants correlate certain emotional and personality characteristics with stimulus persons based on their age in the photographs, their facial expressions, and on their adult positive or negative reputation. Results are discussed in the context of the facial assessment-personality characteristic literature.

Poster Number

47

Faculty Mentor(s)

Mary Radeke

Additional Mentoring Department

Psychology

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May 16th, 2:15 PM May 16th, 4:44 PM

Are the Eyes (and the Face) Truly the Windows to the Soul?

SURC Ballroom C/D

One method for investigating facial inferences and social perception has been to ask individuals to make personality assessments from the faces of unacquainted individuals (Kenny, Albright and Malloy, 1988; Riggio, Lippa and Salinas, 1990; Berry, 1990, 1991). Results generally indicated that individuals unacquainted with stimulus persons can make accurate personality assessments under certain conditions. The current study evaluated the capacities of individuals to make personality assessments of unacquainted individuals from facial expressions in photographs. The photographs were age-varied, pre-fame childhood pictures of individuals who later became famous as adults, either renown for positive behavior and societal contributions, or notorious for negative behavior and destructiveness. Six pre-fame photographs (two toddlers, two 10 year olds, two early teens), three of ‘positive’ individuals and three of ‘negative’ individuals, were selected from a pool of 24 pictures, based on lack of recognition in a pilot study. They were electronically and randomly presented sequentially to single participants in an online survey. Each participant responded to a series of questions about various personality characteristics of the stimulus person, while the photograph remained on screen, before being presented with the next photograph and question set. Results indicated that participants correlate certain emotional and personality characteristics with stimulus persons based on their age in the photographs, their facial expressions, and on their adult positive or negative reputation. Results are discussed in the context of the facial assessment-personality characteristic literature.