Title

Water Quality V. Energy Supply: The Dilemma of Hydraulic Fracturing

Presenter Information

Landon Weigel

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

Natural gas in the United States is plentiful, inexpensive, and becoming a significant trend in domestic energy production. However, adequate regulation is a challenge. Cost benefit analysis has determined that wastewater processes, exploration, and emissions from production are negatively affecting the environment. Water contamination from fracking is an overwhelming concern. Secrecy has been a major problem since the 2005 ‘Halliburton loophole,' which exempts hydraulic fracturing from many of the nation’s key environmental-protection laws, including the Clean Water Act, Safe Drinking Water Act, Clean Air Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, and Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act. According to Dr. Theo Colborn, 90 percent of the fluids used in the fracking process cause major health concerns and birth defects. Production procedures allow for contaminant leaching into local watersheds. This analysis will determine the effectiveness of current regulatory regimes in controlling the effects of hydraulic fracturing on local water quality.

Poster Number

33

Faculty Mentor(s)

Rex Wirth

Additional Mentoring Department

Political Science

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May 16th, 2:15 PM May 16th, 4:44 PM

Water Quality V. Energy Supply: The Dilemma of Hydraulic Fracturing

SURC Ballroom C/D

Natural gas in the United States is plentiful, inexpensive, and becoming a significant trend in domestic energy production. However, adequate regulation is a challenge. Cost benefit analysis has determined that wastewater processes, exploration, and emissions from production are negatively affecting the environment. Water contamination from fracking is an overwhelming concern. Secrecy has been a major problem since the 2005 ‘Halliburton loophole,' which exempts hydraulic fracturing from many of the nation’s key environmental-protection laws, including the Clean Water Act, Safe Drinking Water Act, Clean Air Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, and Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act. According to Dr. Theo Colborn, 90 percent of the fluids used in the fracking process cause major health concerns and birth defects. Production procedures allow for contaminant leaching into local watersheds. This analysis will determine the effectiveness of current regulatory regimes in controlling the effects of hydraulic fracturing on local water quality.