Title

Conducting Social Research on the Occupy Movement

Presenter Information

Michael Lee

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

For this project, I co-presented a paper at the 2013 Pacific Sociological Association conference with Professors Nelson Pichardo, Pamela McMullin-Messier and Tracey Hoover. In the course of this project I have learned firsthand how research is conducted in sociology, which includes applying for grants, conducting surveys and interview research, and applying for and receiving HSRC approval. The paper, “Internet Activism and the Mitigation of Costs and Risks: The OWS Movement in the Pacific Northwest,” is the culmination of a research project that I have been conducting with the aforementioned professors over the last two years in collecting web-based and survey research on new forms of social activism that have taken shape in the age of the Internet. New forms of communication and new forms of social networking have had a significant impact on the repertoire of social movements. However, the literature that has focused on these new repertoires of internet-based activism has primarily focused on low-risk/cost forms of social movement behavior while only speculating on high-cost/risk forms of activism. In this paper we examined the means by which the Occupy movement that took shape in Seattle and Portland lowered or mitigated the high costs and risks associated with Occupy Wall Street activism.

Poster Number

53

Faculty Mentor(s)

Pamela McMullin-Messier, Nelson Pichardo, Tracey Hoover

Additional Mentoring Department

Sociology

Additional Mentoring Department

Sociology

Additional Mentoring Department

Sociology

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May 16th, 2:15 PM May 16th, 4:44 PM

Conducting Social Research on the Occupy Movement

SURC Ballroom C/D

For this project, I co-presented a paper at the 2013 Pacific Sociological Association conference with Professors Nelson Pichardo, Pamela McMullin-Messier and Tracey Hoover. In the course of this project I have learned firsthand how research is conducted in sociology, which includes applying for grants, conducting surveys and interview research, and applying for and receiving HSRC approval. The paper, “Internet Activism and the Mitigation of Costs and Risks: The OWS Movement in the Pacific Northwest,” is the culmination of a research project that I have been conducting with the aforementioned professors over the last two years in collecting web-based and survey research on new forms of social activism that have taken shape in the age of the Internet. New forms of communication and new forms of social networking have had a significant impact on the repertoire of social movements. However, the literature that has focused on these new repertoires of internet-based activism has primarily focused on low-risk/cost forms of social movement behavior while only speculating on high-cost/risk forms of activism. In this paper we examined the means by which the Occupy movement that took shape in Seattle and Portland lowered or mitigated the high costs and risks associated with Occupy Wall Street activism.