Title

Decrease in Acid Rain Over 23 year Study at Paradise, Mt.Rainier Nation Park

Presenter Information

James Agren

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

Weekly wet precipitation samples from Paradise in Mt. Rainier National Park, Washington, spanning the period 1988 to the present, have been analyzed for major anions and cations, conductivity and pH. Volume weighted 3-month averages were tested for significant trends throughout the 23-year monitoring period and compared with analogous data collected at established National Atmospheric Deposition Program sites throughout the state. Over the last 23 years of the study, proton concentrations decreased by 59 percent resulting in a pH increase of wet precipitation that has increased from 5.1 to 5.5 (P=0.001). These results indicate that air pollution standards contribute significantly to the decrease in acid rain deposition to this pristine and vulnerable high elevation location, and that no apparent trans-Pacific transport of pollution is detected from Asia.

Poster Number

18

Faculty Mentor(s)

Anne Johansen

Additional Mentoring Department

Chemistry

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May 16th, 2:15 PM May 16th, 4:44 PM

Decrease in Acid Rain Over 23 year Study at Paradise, Mt.Rainier Nation Park

SURC Ballroom C/D

Weekly wet precipitation samples from Paradise in Mt. Rainier National Park, Washington, spanning the period 1988 to the present, have been analyzed for major anions and cations, conductivity and pH. Volume weighted 3-month averages were tested for significant trends throughout the 23-year monitoring period and compared with analogous data collected at established National Atmospheric Deposition Program sites throughout the state. Over the last 23 years of the study, proton concentrations decreased by 59 percent resulting in a pH increase of wet precipitation that has increased from 5.1 to 5.5 (P=0.001). These results indicate that air pollution standards contribute significantly to the decrease in acid rain deposition to this pristine and vulnerable high elevation location, and that no apparent trans-Pacific transport of pollution is detected from Asia.