Title

Diversity of Mycena Species in the Eastern Cascades

Presenter Information

Christina Goldberg

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

Fungi in forest ecosystems compose a large percentage of the biomass, and are involved in complex and poorly understood interactions with other organisms that have rarely been studied in any depth. The genus Mycena is a large group of fungi containing approximately 300 species, with diverse morphological forms including typical mushrooms, bolete-like forms, and pleurotoid types. These fungi function in parasitic relationships with orchids where the orchids are parasites, but most important litter and wood decomposers. This study focuses on the diversity of Mycena in established plots in the eastern Cascades, and is part of a larger study focusing on how diversity of tree species affects the diversity of fungi in this ecosystem. This study includes samples collected between 2009 and 2012 from 30 plots across most major forest types in the Cle Elum Ranger District. DNA was extracted from various representative collections and the internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA was amplified using PCR. Fragments were then sequenced and analyzed using phylogenetic methods. Results suggest that Mycena in the eastern Cascades is very diverse and includes a number both known and undescribed species.

Poster Number

24

Faculty Mentor(s)

Jim Johnson

Additional Mentoring Department

Biological Sciences

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May 16th, 8:20 AM May 16th, 10:50 AM

Diversity of Mycena Species in the Eastern Cascades

SURC Ballroom C/D

Fungi in forest ecosystems compose a large percentage of the biomass, and are involved in complex and poorly understood interactions with other organisms that have rarely been studied in any depth. The genus Mycena is a large group of fungi containing approximately 300 species, with diverse morphological forms including typical mushrooms, bolete-like forms, and pleurotoid types. These fungi function in parasitic relationships with orchids where the orchids are parasites, but most important litter and wood decomposers. This study focuses on the diversity of Mycena in established plots in the eastern Cascades, and is part of a larger study focusing on how diversity of tree species affects the diversity of fungi in this ecosystem. This study includes samples collected between 2009 and 2012 from 30 plots across most major forest types in the Cle Elum Ranger District. DNA was extracted from various representative collections and the internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA was amplified using PCR. Fragments were then sequenced and analyzed using phylogenetic methods. Results suggest that Mycena in the eastern Cascades is very diverse and includes a number both known and undescribed species.