Title

DNA from chewed vegetation: a non-invasive collection strategy for arboreal primates

Presenter Information

Jennifer Humphreys

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

Noninvasive collection of genetic materials from cryptic and endangered primates is challenging and thus traditionally limited to samples such as feces, urine or hair. Saliva, while higher-quality, is more difficult to obtain and thus limited to terrestrial and/or habituated populations. This study examines a novel procedure for noninvasive saliva collection using fruit specimens discarded by golden-handed tamarins (Saguinus midas) in Bergendal, Republic of Suriname. The mtDNA CO1 locus amplifies successfully which is indicative of the presence of platyrrhine DNA. This technique could have wide application for obtaining saliva samples from endangered, cryptic, arboreal and/or non-habituated primate populations.

Poster Number

11

Faculty Mentor(s)

Joseph Lorenz

Additional Mentoring Department

Anthropology

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 16th, 8:20 AM May 16th, 10:50 AM

DNA from chewed vegetation: a non-invasive collection strategy for arboreal primates

SURC Ballroom C/D

Noninvasive collection of genetic materials from cryptic and endangered primates is challenging and thus traditionally limited to samples such as feces, urine or hair. Saliva, while higher-quality, is more difficult to obtain and thus limited to terrestrial and/or habituated populations. This study examines a novel procedure for noninvasive saliva collection using fruit specimens discarded by golden-handed tamarins (Saguinus midas) in Bergendal, Republic of Suriname. The mtDNA CO1 locus amplifies successfully which is indicative of the presence of platyrrhine DNA. This technique could have wide application for obtaining saliva samples from endangered, cryptic, arboreal and/or non-habituated primate populations.