Title

Does Pell Eligibility Affect Inclinations of Potential Study Abroad Students?

Presenter Information

Logan Blair

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

Most would agree that the decision to study abroad in a foreign country is an unquantifiable decision based solely on the individual’s independence, their ability to adapt, and self-reliance. I argue that quantitative predictors, primarily student family wealth represented by Pell grant eligibility, are real determining factors. Other factors such as grade point average (GPA), major, class standing, and gender are also considered. Ultimately, a statistical profile of CWU students and their likelihood to study abroad is created. Employing a database retrieved from CWU institutional research, causal relationships are shown using various regression models that yield probability of several significant characteristics and their magnitudes. Low income students are discouraged to study abroad by their economic setbacks when in fact the less wealthy show more characteristics of independence. I reinforce this notion empirically by clearly showing Pell eligibility does not change the statistical probability of studying abroad. Because few econometric studies in the field of international education profiling have been done, this research could be used by educators and program providers alike to efficiently reach receptive student cohorts.

Poster Number

25

Faculty Mentor(s)

Charles Wassell

Additional Mentoring Department

Economics

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May 16th, 11:30 AM May 16th, 2:00 PM

Does Pell Eligibility Affect Inclinations of Potential Study Abroad Students?

SURC Ballroom C/D

Most would agree that the decision to study abroad in a foreign country is an unquantifiable decision based solely on the individual’s independence, their ability to adapt, and self-reliance. I argue that quantitative predictors, primarily student family wealth represented by Pell grant eligibility, are real determining factors. Other factors such as grade point average (GPA), major, class standing, and gender are also considered. Ultimately, a statistical profile of CWU students and their likelihood to study abroad is created. Employing a database retrieved from CWU institutional research, causal relationships are shown using various regression models that yield probability of several significant characteristics and their magnitudes. Low income students are discouraged to study abroad by their economic setbacks when in fact the less wealthy show more characteristics of independence. I reinforce this notion empirically by clearly showing Pell eligibility does not change the statistical probability of studying abroad. Because few econometric studies in the field of international education profiling have been done, this research could be used by educators and program providers alike to efficiently reach receptive student cohorts.