Title

Effect of fat supplemented diets on the physiology of C. elegans

Presenter Information

John Carter

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

Obesity is a serious medical issue as it is linked to conditions such as heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. In the United States, more than one-third of adults are obese and the medical cost related to obesity in 2008 was estimated to be $147 billion. Our previous work has shown that fat supplementation of C. elegans diet with either stearic or oleic acid leads to mitochondrial changes such as an increase in ATP production. The aim of this study was to investigate how the fat supplementation of the C. elegans diet causes physiological changes within the organism. First, it was verified that the fat supplementation was integrated into the C. elegans diet and into the subsequently into the worms themselves. Next, due to the possibility that the worms may simply be metabolizing the supplemented fats, the lipid storage of the worms was measured to see if the worms were storing any of the fats from their supplemented diet. To see if fat supplemented worms exhibit a change in size, the volume of the worms was calculated. Lastly, worm locomotion was measured because it is indicative of changes in neurological behavior and muscle function. Our data demonstrate that the fat supplementation does lead to increased fatty acid content well as elevated lipid storage in C. elegans.

Poster Number

38

Faculty Mentor(s)

Carin Thomas, Lucinda Carnell

Additional Mentoring Department

Chemistry

Additional Mentoring Department

Biological Sciences

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May 16th, 8:20 AM May 16th, 10:50 AM

Effect of fat supplemented diets on the physiology of C. elegans

SURC Ballroom C/D

Obesity is a serious medical issue as it is linked to conditions such as heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. In the United States, more than one-third of adults are obese and the medical cost related to obesity in 2008 was estimated to be $147 billion. Our previous work has shown that fat supplementation of C. elegans diet with either stearic or oleic acid leads to mitochondrial changes such as an increase in ATP production. The aim of this study was to investigate how the fat supplementation of the C. elegans diet causes physiological changes within the organism. First, it was verified that the fat supplementation was integrated into the C. elegans diet and into the subsequently into the worms themselves. Next, due to the possibility that the worms may simply be metabolizing the supplemented fats, the lipid storage of the worms was measured to see if the worms were storing any of the fats from their supplemented diet. To see if fat supplemented worms exhibit a change in size, the volume of the worms was calculated. Lastly, worm locomotion was measured because it is indicative of changes in neurological behavior and muscle function. Our data demonstrate that the fat supplementation does lead to increased fatty acid content well as elevated lipid storage in C. elegans.