Title

Effect of Heloderma suspectum venom on MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation, Metabolism, and Morphology

Presenter Information

Thomas Nichols
Dana Tucker
Seth Ronk

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

Venom is widely known for its ability to destroy biological tissues, but less is known about its potential to treat disease. Venom, a mixture of biological compounds including enzymes, proteins, peptides, and small molecular weight molecules, has been used to treat a wide range of problems, including autoimmune disease, multiple sclerosis, diabetes, and cancer. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of fractionated Gila monster venom on cultured human MCF-7 breast cancer cell proliferation rates and morphology. Briefly, fresh venom was milked from a Gila monster, dissolved in water, and size-fractionated using Nanosep centrifugation. Five fractions of varying molecular weight (3, 10, 30, 50, and 100kD) were isolated and administered to subconfluent MCF-7 human breast cancer cells that were subsequently assayed for proliferation and metabolic rates and morphology. The 3kD venom fraction had the largest effect on MCF-7 proliferation rate, metabolism, and morphology than did crude venom extract. A direct relationship was observed between fractioned venom concentration and MCF-7 cell death, whereas crude venom showed less proportional changes in MCF-7 death rate. These findings suggest that fractionated Gila monster venom contains factors that more potently affect human breast cancer cell death, and thus presents an intriguing future avenue for the use of venom in human breast cancer research.

Poster Number

27

Faculty Mentor(s)

Ian Quitadamo

Additional Mentoring Department

Biological Sciences

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May 16th, 8:20 AM May 16th, 10:50 AM

Effect of Heloderma suspectum venom on MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation, Metabolism, and Morphology

SURC Ballroom C/D

Venom is widely known for its ability to destroy biological tissues, but less is known about its potential to treat disease. Venom, a mixture of biological compounds including enzymes, proteins, peptides, and small molecular weight molecules, has been used to treat a wide range of problems, including autoimmune disease, multiple sclerosis, diabetes, and cancer. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of fractionated Gila monster venom on cultured human MCF-7 breast cancer cell proliferation rates and morphology. Briefly, fresh venom was milked from a Gila monster, dissolved in water, and size-fractionated using Nanosep centrifugation. Five fractions of varying molecular weight (3, 10, 30, 50, and 100kD) were isolated and administered to subconfluent MCF-7 human breast cancer cells that were subsequently assayed for proliferation and metabolic rates and morphology. The 3kD venom fraction had the largest effect on MCF-7 proliferation rate, metabolism, and morphology than did crude venom extract. A direct relationship was observed between fractioned venom concentration and MCF-7 cell death, whereas crude venom showed less proportional changes in MCF-7 death rate. These findings suggest that fractionated Gila monster venom contains factors that more potently affect human breast cancer cell death, and thus presents an intriguing future avenue for the use of venom in human breast cancer research.